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Math for q-physics

  1. Oct 30, 2004 #1
    I was wondering how much math you need to know to do quantum mechanics? Is multivariable calculus sufficient?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 30, 2004 #2

    cepheid

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    Linear Algebra strikes me as being pretty important too. In any case, the more math, the better
     
  4. Oct 30, 2004 #3

    ZapperZ

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    It is dangerous to think that (1) one can narrow down what "tools" one needs for doing quantum mechanics and (2) that one can just learn QM alone without bother about the other physics areas such as classical mechanics and classical E&M.

    What you should learn is the mathematics to do physics. It is the only way that I know of to do and start to understand QM. There are many books (even one I recommend without hesitation in one of my journal entry) that cover mathematical physics. Pick one up!

    Zz.
     
  5. Oct 30, 2004 #4
    WOW thanks a whole lot ZAPPERZ!! Your journals are very helpful. I went and checked out the book on amazon and its a bit expensive but ill try and get it for christmas. What I ment to ask in this thread was what is the prerequisit math for quantum mechanics, you know how the say to take electricity and magnetism you should have taken integral calculus and currently should be taking multivariable. By the way what about matlab for physics majors? My counselor thought it would be a good idea for me to take a sperate course in matlab(although it is not required), I think it is a great idea, what do you think?
     
    Last edited: Oct 30, 2004
  6. Oct 30, 2004 #5

    ZapperZ

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    Unfortunately, a lot of textbooks are expensive (at least here in the US), unless they are published by Dover. If it's any consolation, I did not recommend that Boas text lightly, and I fully expect it to be buried with me when I die (along with Mattuck's book). :)

    I didn't realize that there's a whole course just on matlab. I suppose it couldn't hurt since it is one of the popular numerical packages that many people use. However, as I've mentioned, you should also learn the various numerical technique and be able to write codes for them. At the advanced/research front level, most of these packages are not able to handle the sophisticated and complex tasks. So knowing the basics of numerical programming is a good skill to have.

    Zz.
     
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