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Math Problem

  1. Sep 9, 2015 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    Evaluate:
    6^1 + 6 ^ −1 / 6^1 − 6 ^ −1

    2. Relevant equations
    Exponent Laws

    3. The attempt at a solution
    6^1 + 6 ^ −1 / 6^1 − 6 ^ −1
    = 6^1 + 6 ^1 / 6^1 − 6 ^ 1 (I flipped the side - top or bottom - of the negative exponent numbers)
    =12/0

    but i think i did it wrong
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 9, 2015 #2

    Bystander

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    Any particular reason?
    Yup, I think that also.
     
  4. Sep 9, 2015 #3
    Well I flipped it because you can't have negative exponents. Also how would you solve the problem?
     
  5. Sep 9, 2015 #4

    Bystander

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    Planck's constant is 6.626x10-34J⋅s.
     
  6. Sep 9, 2015 #5

    Ray Vickson

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    Who says you cannot have negative exponents? They occur everywhere, all the time.

    Of course, I am not allowed to tell you how I would solve the problem, but I am allowed to give hints. The most important hint I can offer is for you to use parentheses, so you can keep things straight. The way you have written it reads as
    [tex] 6^1 + \frac{6^{-1}}{6^1} - 6^{-1} [/tex]
    if parsed according to standard rules for reading expressions. However, maybe you mean
    [tex] \frac{6^1 + 6^{-1}}{ 6^1 - 6^{-1}} [/tex]
    If the latter is what you want then you should write (6^1 + 6^(-1))/(6^1 - 6^(-1)), or [6^1 + 6^(-1)]/[6^1 - 6^(-1)] if you don't want too many "((" or "))" in a row. Note that I write 6^(-1), and not 6^-1, but those parentheses are probably not as important as the ones that delimit the numerator and denominator.
     
    Last edited: Sep 10, 2015
  7. Sep 10, 2015 #6

    HallsofIvy

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    If your problem was, as Ray Vickson suggests, (6+ 6^(-1))/(6- 6^(-1))= (6+ 1/6)/(6- 1/6) then get rid of those "1/6" fractions by multiplying numerator and denominator by 6
     
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