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Math related books (non-textbooks)

  1. Feb 2, 2005 #1

    bfd

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    Forgive me if this is in the wrong discussion section. I was unsure as to where this might belong.

    Can anyone tell me some book titles that deal with the subject of complex numbers or pde's? By this I mean books that use these topics as the choice of discussion and are not mathematical textbooks. for example I'm currently reading "The Riemann Hypothesis: The Greatest Unsolved Problem in Mathematics" by Karl Sabbagh. (Wonderful read by the way. I highly recommend it.)

    Any thoughts are much appreciated.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 2, 2005 #2

    JasonRox

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    I recommend that you read...

    Fermat's Last Theorem - Amir D. Aczel

    I had shiver's going down my spine when it came to the moment that Andrew ... can't say or I'll blow it.

    Did you by any chance try to learn math? There are lots of stuff you can learn in a short time, but to learn more would take more time and dedication.

    For example, you can probably learn why:

    [tex]e^{\pi i}+1=0[/tex]

    ...where i is the imaginary number.

    Wouldn't that be neat? Just to know something like that. It would probably only take a week or two to learn that, depending on how far behind you are.

    Note: Damn you! You got math all worked up in me again! :mad:
     
  4. Feb 2, 2005 #3
    Thats an easy one.

    Unless you actually mean proving Euler's Theorem, then i can't help ya. BUt it would be:
    [tex]
    e^{i\theta} = cos(\theta)+isin(\theta)
    [/tex]
     
  5. Feb 2, 2005 #4

    JasonRox

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    Proving is quite simple.

    Note: You will be working with the series of e, sin and cos.
     
  6. Feb 2, 2005 #5

    Gokul43201

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    Music of the Primes , du Sautoy. A great read, but you might want to save this for later, as it has a good bit in common with Riemann Hypothesis.

    The Code Book, Singh (some math & history, all relating to cryptography)

    Chaos , Gleick

    Most anything written by Ian Stewart (one I really like is his little known - and one of his first books - Concepts of Modern Mathematics) or Martin Gardner.

    This thread should go to the Book Review Section.
     
    Last edited: Feb 2, 2005
  7. Feb 2, 2005 #6
    its simple yes, but i don't remember how its proven offhand.
     
  8. Feb 2, 2005 #7
    Gleick's book is really good. Very interesting and a nice introduction to the field of chaos of theory (not mathematically, but it presents ideas and many applications).
     
  9. Feb 2, 2005 #8

    Gokul43201

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    Write the Taylor expansions for [itex]e^x, ~~ sinx ~~and~~cosx [/itex].
     
  10. Feb 2, 2005 #9
    Prime Obsession by John Derbyshire is a good book where there's a good overview on most of the great unsolved mathematics problems. It's one of the few leisure books granted space on my meager dorm bookshelf. :cool:
     
  11. Feb 2, 2005 #10
    dorm? Donde?
     
  12. Feb 2, 2005 #11

    Integral

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    Donde :eek: :surprised :mad: Don't mention that name here! I'll be looking over my shoulder all night long now for fear that calling the name will reserect him!
     
  13. Feb 3, 2005 #12
    Last time i speak spanish around you. It means "Where"
     
  14. Feb 3, 2005 #13

    Integral

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    One of the original (lets make Pi a rational number) crackpots to post here was called Donde. We spent hours trying to explain to him the concept and meaning of Pi. He spoke his own language and never accepted a word we said. While every word in his sentences was understandable the sum total was incomprehensible. A classic crackpot. Perhaps some of the old PF2 archives still contain his posts. I am not sure how to access them but that would be some amusing reading.
     
  15. Feb 3, 2005 #14
    Ah. No i was not bringing *Donde* up, i was just asking Andromeda which uni.
     
  16. Feb 3, 2005 #15

    JasonRox

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    There was this crackpot at work, but he's gone now. He was talking about some electro theory and some maching that will spin and create energy.

    I asked what the formula is for centripetal force/acceleration because that is important if you're going to spin something really fast. He didn't know. He thought physics formulas are all about plugging it in and that's it. Even if physics is all about plugging numbers, he wouldn't know what number came out or what it meant.

    Funny guy.
     
  17. Feb 4, 2005 #16

    bfd

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    Thank you all for the recommendations! I copied down all the titles recommended for later use (there is so much on my plate to read its not even funny). I did however find one book on complex numbers. Its called "An Imaginary Tale The Story of [tex]sqrt{-1}[/tex] " by Paul J. Nahin. so far its given me a good rundown on the historical orgins and theory of imaginary numbers.
     
    Last edited: Feb 4, 2005
  18. Feb 4, 2005 #17

    bfd

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    When you say "chance to learn math" do you mean through what the book has taught me or where I picked up my current knowledge on math? in regards to the former I try to learn as much as possible from the math that the book is currently presenting me. To answer the latter I have a degree in econ/math (not a double major but rather an equal combination of econ and math courses)

    I completely understand what you mean by the joy in just knowing that simple equation. I am facinated by certain elements of mathematics (for me complex numbers for one example). Usually, as I'm finding out, the more I read the more I become "hooked" for lack of better words on the subject.

    Sorry to get you worked up. I'll be sure to play it safe and stay with postings that deal with the happenings of reality t.v. programs :biggrin:
     
  19. Feb 4, 2005 #18
    I got Ian Stewart's book, "Does God Play Dice?".
     
  20. Feb 4, 2005 #19

    Gokul43201

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    That's one of his more popular books. It's nice in a different (non-mathematical) way from his older and less known books (which gave you a better feel for the math).

    Another fun book is The Paradoxicon by Falletta.
     
  21. Feb 5, 2005 #20

    Astronuc

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    "The Mathematician" by John von Neuman - rare book.

    von Neumann wrote:

    G. H. Hardy wrote in "A Mathematician's Apology":

     
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