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Math to know before calculus

  1. Mar 17, 2010 #1
    Hey guys, I'm starting calculus this summer and don't feel very confident in my high school math skills. Are there any books I could read that would be able to reteach me trigonometry (stuff like the unit circle, identities, etc not talking about basic solving for angles/sides of a triangle), algebra, etc?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 17, 2010 #2
    I can't remember any books right at this moment but you're correct that you should review basic trig. More importantly, review as much as you can about functions. This is the central focus for most arguments in calculus. Any good calculus book and instructor will review the basics before going into the mathematical structure of calculus. Calculus, at first, may seem very difficult because of the new notation, but once you understand the meaning of the derivative and integral it becomes easily digestible.
     
  4. Mar 21, 2010 #3
    I highly recommend How To Ace Calculus: The Streetwise Guide as a nice introduction to Calculus. I'm using it now to self study so my summer calculus course isn't too overwhelming. It lacks practice problem sets but you can find plenty of those on the web with a little digging.

    For Trig I recommend http://oakroadsystems.com/twt/ [Broken]. It's free and does a pretty good job explaining things.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  5. Mar 21, 2010 #4
  6. Mar 21, 2010 #5
  7. Mar 22, 2010 #6
    I think it's easy for you to find what you want. Just use google and type what you need.
     
  8. Mar 22, 2010 #7
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 24, 2017
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