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Mathematica & the GPU

  1. Jun 14, 2008 #1
    I was playing around with Mathematica and I discovered this via the help:

    [​IMG]

    ...which is basically the most bad-ass 3D graph I've ever seen, much less had generated on my computer! Yes, I'm only in Calc II for now, but now I can't WAIT to get to Calc III and learn how to visualize pretty 3D graphs!

    Anyway, my question is this - right now, I believe my CPU is rendering these graphs, but I want my GPU to render it. I think it might be a lot faster, and allow me to tinker more. Does anyone have any idea on how to do that?

    Many thanks
     
    Last edited: Jun 14, 2008
  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 15, 2008 #2
    Sounds like you'd be interested in Nvidias CUDA...

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CUDA

    http://www.nvidia.com/object/cuda_home.html
    http://www.nvidia.com/object/cuda_get.html
     
  4. Jun 15, 2008 #3
    I think wants:

    EDIT >> Preferences
    Advanced Tab
    Open Option Inspector Button
    Click the "+" sign next to graphics options
    "Rendering Options"

    and change the graphics 3d rendering engine to "hardware"
     
  5. Jun 15, 2008 #4
    Thanks for the tip! Unfortunately it didn't make it any faster, although "software" makes it extremely slow. Maybe I'm making a few vital assumptions about either my machine or how Mathematica renders that are wrong.
     
  6. Jun 15, 2008 #5
    It's hard to do an accurate implicit plot of that transcendental equation!

    Try changing it to a polynomial equation of high order and you'll find it to be much faster.
     
  7. Jun 15, 2008 #6
    Also, I think it IS hardware rendered, but your GPU can't calculate the solutions.
     
  8. Jun 16, 2008 #7
    Crosson, how do I do that? Or where could I go to find out how to? Can Mathematica do it for me?

    Mr. Healey, I believe this is the case as well. However, I think I would probably need something like nVidia's CUDA in order to get it to work, like Elliot said. I don't think Mathematica supports DirectX or OpenGL...
     
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