Mathematical methods in physics

  • Thread starter ercagpince
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  • #1
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Lately a book for mathematical methods in physics is discussed on many topics. However, I couldn't find a sufficient answer for my specific problem.

I took math. methods course while i was undergrad., I passed it quite successfully. Although, I did enjoy the course, I couldn't learn much on it. For instance, I can't even remember what sort of special functions one uses for a specific physical problem, or I can't solve a problem concerning fundamental fourier transform.

Thus, this summer I want to reconstruct my knowledge on that field which I think is crucial for a graduate student.Since I'll be self studying,I need a very explanatory, didactic book and I don't know which book is the best in this case. I have bought Boas' book considering reviews around but I don't whether it is the best choice for my situation.
 

Answers and Replies

  • #3
berkeman
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a book for mathematical methods in physics
I am enjoying self-studying from this textbook by Mentor @Orodruin :

https://www.physicsforums.com/insights/the-birth-of-a-textbook/
243955
 
  • #4
gleem
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I have bought Boas' book considering reviews around but I don't whether it is the best choice for my situation.

And what is your situation. Books have a tendency to strengths and weakness relative to your background and future needs. We each may have our own preference but will it be the best for you? I think only you can determine that. Are you pursuing a theoretical track for your graduate studies, if so what area since this will define the math that is most relevant.
 
  • #5
Choppy
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I think the OP was in 2008.
Whatever @ercagpine's circumstances were in 2008, I'm sure they've changed by now.
 
  • #6
gleem
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How did this thread surface at this time?
 
  • #7
berkeman
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How did this thread surface at this time?
There's an effort to be sure that all posts get at least one useful reply, to help folks who get here via Google searches. I think there is a thread about it in the Feedback forum, and one in the Advisor forum... :smile:
 
  • #8
gleem
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Well, ok I'll go along with that. I think my post is still useful for prospective Googlers
 

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