Matter-Antimatter Pair Annihilation: Exploring the Mystery

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In summary, matter and antimatter pairs do not always annihilate immediately. For example, they can form a bound state called positronium that can last for a relatively long period of time. This shows that matter and antimatter can coexist without annihilating, contrary to how ordinary matter with opposite charges behaves. This phenomenon has been observed and studied in various experiments and is explained by the principles of quantum mechanics.
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quantumkiko
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Why does an matter-antimatter pair annihilate each other instead of "sticking" together (i.e. like ordinary matter with opposite charges do)?
 
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In fact, they don't always annihilate right away. For example, an electron and a positron may form a bound state called positronium. Positronium doesn't live forever, but a certain form of it can live for a relatively long amount of time, more than 100 nanoseconds! That may not sound like much, but it does show that matter and anti matter don't have to immediately annihilate.

http://prl.aps.org/abstract/PRL/v90/i20/e203402
http://physicsworld.com/cws/article/news/17559
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Positronium

Hope this helps.
 
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  • #3
A relativistic positron can annihilate in flight with an atomic electron in matter. The integrated probability for a 50-MeV stopping positron is ~ 15%. See pages 384-6 in Heitler "The Quantum Theory of Radiation" Fourth Edition.
Bob S
 
  • #4
Thank you very much for the feedbacks! I appreciate it. =)
 

Related to Matter-Antimatter Pair Annihilation: Exploring the Mystery

1. What is matter-antimatter pair annihilation?

Matter-antimatter pair annihilation is a physical process in which a particle and its corresponding antiparticle collide and are converted into energy. This process is governed by the laws of conservation of energy and mass.

2. How is matter-antimatter pair annihilation studied?

Scientists study matter-antimatter pair annihilation by colliding particles and antiparticles in particle accelerators, such as the Large Hadron Collider. They then analyze the energy and particles produced from the collision to gain insights into the properties of matter and antimatter.

3. Why is matter-antimatter pair annihilation important?

Matter-antimatter pair annihilation is important because it helps us understand the fundamental nature of our universe. It is also believed to have played a crucial role in the early universe, as it is thought to have been responsible for creating the imbalance between matter and antimatter that allowed for the formation of the universe as we know it.

4. What are the potential applications of matter-antimatter pair annihilation?

One potential application of matter-antimatter pair annihilation is in energy production. When matter and antimatter annihilate, they release a large amount of energy. If we could harness this energy, it could potentially provide a more efficient and powerful source of energy compared to traditional sources.

5. What mysteries are scientists hoping to solve through the study of matter-antimatter pair annihilation?

Scientists hope to use the study of matter-antimatter pair annihilation to answer some of the biggest mysteries in physics, such as why there is more matter than antimatter in the universe, and why the universe is expanding at an accelerating rate. They also hope to gain a better understanding of the fundamental forces and particles that make up our universe.

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