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Maximum power with transformers

  1. Sep 7, 2011 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    In Figure 1, the transform is perfect (k = 1). Calculate the maximum power which can be transferred to the load ZL. Design a dipole which that power can be transferred to.


    2. Relevant equations
    k = 1 --> n = sqrt(L1/L2).

    Pmax = |V(rms)|/(4*Rg)

    The result must be Pmax = 0.368 W approximately.


    3. The attempt at a solution
    I've eliminated the transform dividing current source maximum value (I = 1) by n = 0.5 and each impedance by n^2 = 0.5^2. Then, I've obtained the Thevenin equivalent of the circuit from ZL. Eventually, I've used the formula for Pmax. I've got Pmax = 0.380 W. OK.

    However, the problem solution offers another way to solve it, which is shown in Figure 2. In this case, the maximum value for current source is 2, and, the elimination of the transform is done after getting the Thevenin equivalent circuit. I don't understand why the maximum value is 2. Why?

    Thank you.
     

    Attached Files:

  2. jcsd
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