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Maximum tangential speed

  1. Mar 15, 2009 #1
    The problem statement, all variables and given/known data

    The spin cycles of a washing machine have two angular speeds, 448rev/min and 619rev/min . The internal diameter of the drum is 0.670m.

    a. What is the ratio of the maximum radial force on the laundry for the higher angular speed to that for the lower speed?

    b. What is the ratio of the maximum tangential speed of the laundry for the higher angular speed to that for the lower speed?

    c.Find the laundry's maximum tangential speed .


    d.Find the laundry's maximum radial acceleration, in terms of g.


    The attempt at a solution

    I have found the answer ro part a and b, which are 1.91 and 1.38 respectively.
    But how do i find part c?


    can someone help me pls? thanks!
     
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2009
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 15, 2009 #2

    Doc Al

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    Staff: Mentor

    How are angular and tangential speed related?
     
  4. Mar 15, 2009 #3
    v = r * omega
     
  5. Mar 15, 2009 #4
    yah. i have found linear speed of the higher omega to be 3.456 m/s and that of the lower omega to be 2.5013 m/s. thats how i get part a and b answer..

    but for part c, the ans is not 3.456 m/s.. Then i duno wad to do le..
     
  6. Mar 15, 2009 #5

    Doc Al

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    Staff: Mentor

    Show how you got those answers. What did you get for omega?
     
  7. Mar 15, 2009 #6
    omega is as given, 619 rev/min and 448rev/min?
    so v = (0.67/2)(619) = 207.365 rev/min = 3.46m/s
    and v = (0.67/2)(448) = 150.08 rev/min = 2.5013m/s
     
  8. Mar 15, 2009 #7
    hmm.. correct?
     
  9. Mar 15, 2009 #8

    Doc Al

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    No, not correct.
    To use this equation, omega must be in radians/second.
     
  10. Mar 15, 2009 #9
    oh! yah!!! okay, i got it :) thanks!

    but for the last part, how to find the radial accel?

    if i use a = v^2/r, i'm finding tangential accel too rite?
     
  11. Mar 15, 2009 #10

    Doc Al

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    That formula gives you the radial (centripetal) acceleration. (There's no tangential acceleration in this problem.)
     
  12. Mar 15, 2009 #11
    okay thanks a lot!! :):)
     
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