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Maxwell equations

  1. Jan 30, 2010 #1

    nur

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    hi everyone i want a real explanation to maxwell equations and exactely a meaning physicly to dérivation to an magnitic ....
    thanks
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 30, 2010 #2

    Pythagorean

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    That's not something that could easily come out of one post without someone dedicating a lot of time and energy. That's why we have whole text books written about electrodynamics:

    9780139199608.jpg

    So unless you have specific questions, I suggest you take an electromagnetism course or buy the book if you have the math background to understand it.
     
  4. Feb 8, 2010 #3

    nur

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    Ok explain to me what mean derivation in physique (pratic and not in math ) i give you a field of magnitic "b" so derivat it to get "e" how that ?

    Thanks
     
  5. Feb 8, 2010 #4

    fluidistic

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    I suggest you to check out wikipedia. Type "Maxwell equations" there and you'll see them detailed.
     
  6. Feb 8, 2010 #5
    What maths are required for complete use this book?
     
  7. Feb 8, 2010 #6

    Born2bwire

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    Calculus and basic vector calculus. Like most electromagnetics texts, he does a brief review of some of the vector concepts that you need to know. Giancoli has a decent college physics set of textbooks that would require trigonometry. However, the lack of calculus means that it is more memorization and at a simpler level. That is, most of the time you spend learning the equations that come out of the calculus of electromagnetics for specific situations. With a university physics course you learn the more fundamental equations that you would use to derive most of the equations given to you in the Giancoli text. Just about all of classical electromagnetics can be described by five equations.
     
  8. Feb 9, 2010 #7
    Bad news nur. There is no real explanation as to the physical meaning of Maxwell's equations! Maxwell derived them using a hydrostatic model which he assumed applied to what was in that day called the "luminiferous aether". This was a material assumed to fill all space. Unfortunately later experiments showed that the properties expected of aether in Maxwell's day did not agree with reality. Eventually this led to physics rejecting the entire idea of an aether. (though a rethinking rather than total rejection might have made more sense).

    The bottom line is that without the aether, there is NO physical basis for an explanation of Maxwell's equations. And today they are simply pure mathematics that is applied certain problems without any real underlying model. In fact, we now know they are certainly not even correct. For example, light is now known to not be an electromagnetic wave at all! Such a wave does not have the properties to explain the observed phenomena such as photo electric effect. But even in classical physics there seems to be reason enough for a thorough re-examination of what Maxwell did with an eye to trying to uncover some kind of workable physical model.
     
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