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Maxwell's equations

  1. Integral

    7 vote(s)
    30.4%
  2. Differential

    16 vote(s)
    69.6%
  1. Jun 23, 2011 #1
    Which form do you prefer, the integral form or differential form?

    EDIT: Forgot to say I prefer the integral form.
     
    Last edited: Jun 23, 2011
  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 23, 2011 #2

    fluidistic

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    You forgot the tensor form! :D
     
  4. Jun 23, 2011 #3

    Drakkith

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    Where's the option for "Who's Maxwell and what do these two terms mean"?
     
  5. Jun 23, 2011 #4
    I'm unfamiliar with the tensor form o.o! It would probably make little sense to me :P



    They're 4 equations, and that ain't in this poll :P.
     
  6. Jun 23, 2011 #5

    WannabeNewton

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    I would have liked to see the differential forms version of Maxwell's equations, very elegant way of expressing them. But since they aren't up there I would have to go with the differential form because the del operator looks cool =D
     
  7. Jun 23, 2011 #6

    atyy

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    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 25, 2014
  8. Jun 24, 2011 #7
    You need to use both.
     
  9. Jun 24, 2011 #8

    Drakkith

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    WTF was that?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 25, 2014
  10. Jun 24, 2011 #9
    Which one of Maxwell's equations is your favorite? Mine is Faraday's equation.
     
  11. Jun 24, 2011 #10
    Like the differential form!! Altough i have just started them. MIT lectures are great!! :smile:
     
  12. Jun 24, 2011 #11
    Integral... how the hell am I supposed to calculate with the differential form without my head imploding? :redface:

    Favourite one: Gauss's Law - the easiest concept to grasp imho. :shy:
     
    Last edited: Jun 24, 2011
  13. Jun 24, 2011 #12

    dextercioby

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    What's more beautiful than [itex] dF= 0 [/itex] and [itex] \delta F=j [/itex] ? :wink:
     
  14. Jun 24, 2011 #13

    I like Serena

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    I like this one best:
    [tex]\square A^\alpha = \mu_0 J^\alpha[/tex]
    That is, all of Maxwell's equations rolled into one simple equation! :smile:
     
  15. Jun 24, 2011 #14

    WannabeNewton

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    Is [itex]\delta F [/itex] the same as [itex]d(\star F) [/itex]?
     
  16. Jun 24, 2011 #15

    dextercioby

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    Essentially, up to a possible minus sign depending on the dimension of spacetime and metric signature , delta = * d * .
     
  17. Jun 24, 2011 #16

    dextercioby

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    Well, not really, the fundamental gauge symmetry is missing in your equation.
     
  18. Jun 24, 2011 #17

    I like Serena

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    I'm not familiar with fundamental gauge symmetry yet.
    What is it?

    Is it part of Maxwell's equations?
     
  19. Jun 24, 2011 #18
    The integral form is easier to visualize because the curls turn into line and surface integrals which naturally illustrate relationships between things like enclosed current and MMF.
     
    Last edited: Jun 24, 2011
  20. Jun 24, 2011 #19

    dextercioby

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    Yes, the reason we use potentials is quantum mechanics and quantum field theory. A quantum theory of the electromagnetic field cannot be built without dealing with the gauge symmetry first.
     
  21. Jun 25, 2011 #20
    I like how we call them Maxwell's equations even tho it was Faraday and Heaviside that pretty much came up with them.
     
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