Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Maxwell's equations

  1. Integral

    7 vote(s)
    30.4%
  2. Differential

    16 vote(s)
    69.6%
  1. Jun 23, 2011 #1
    Which form do you prefer, the integral form or differential form?

    EDIT: Forgot to say I prefer the integral form.
     
    Last edited: Jun 23, 2011
  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 23, 2011 #2

    fluidistic

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    You forgot the tensor form! :D
     
  4. Jun 23, 2011 #3

    Drakkith

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    Where's the option for "Who's Maxwell and what do these two terms mean"?
     
  5. Jun 23, 2011 #4
    I'm unfamiliar with the tensor form o.o! It would probably make little sense to me :P



    They're 4 equations, and that ain't in this poll :P.
     
  6. Jun 23, 2011 #5

    WannabeNewton

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor

    I would have liked to see the differential forms version of Maxwell's equations, very elegant way of expressing them. But since they aren't up there I would have to go with the differential form because the del operator looks cool =D
     
  7. Jun 23, 2011 #6

    atyy

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor

     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 25, 2014
  8. Jun 24, 2011 #7
    You need to use both.
     
  9. Jun 24, 2011 #8

    Drakkith

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    WTF was that?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 25, 2014
  10. Jun 24, 2011 #9
    Which one of Maxwell's equations is your favorite? Mine is Faraday's equation.
     
  11. Jun 24, 2011 #10
    Like the differential form!! Altough i have just started them. MIT lectures are great!! :smile:
     
  12. Jun 24, 2011 #11
    Integral... how the hell am I supposed to calculate with the differential form without my head imploding? :redface:

    Favourite one: Gauss's Law - the easiest concept to grasp imho. :shy:
     
    Last edited: Jun 24, 2011
  13. Jun 24, 2011 #12

    dextercioby

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    What's more beautiful than [itex] dF= 0 [/itex] and [itex] \delta F=j [/itex] ? :wink:
     
  14. Jun 24, 2011 #13

    I like Serena

    User Avatar
    Homework Helper

    I like this one best:
    [tex]\square A^\alpha = \mu_0 J^\alpha[/tex]
    That is, all of Maxwell's equations rolled into one simple equation! :smile:
     
  15. Jun 24, 2011 #14

    WannabeNewton

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor

    Is [itex]\delta F [/itex] the same as [itex]d(\star F) [/itex]?
     
  16. Jun 24, 2011 #15

    dextercioby

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    Essentially, up to a possible minus sign depending on the dimension of spacetime and metric signature , delta = * d * .
     
  17. Jun 24, 2011 #16

    dextercioby

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    Well, not really, the fundamental gauge symmetry is missing in your equation.
     
  18. Jun 24, 2011 #17

    I like Serena

    User Avatar
    Homework Helper

    I'm not familiar with fundamental gauge symmetry yet.
    What is it?

    Is it part of Maxwell's equations?
     
  19. Jun 24, 2011 #18
    The integral form is easier to visualize because the curls turn into line and surface integrals which naturally illustrate relationships between things like enclosed current and MMF.
     
    Last edited: Jun 24, 2011
  20. Jun 24, 2011 #19

    dextercioby

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    Yes, the reason we use potentials is quantum mechanics and quantum field theory. A quantum theory of the electromagnetic field cannot be built without dealing with the gauge symmetry first.
     
  21. Jun 25, 2011 #20
    I like how we call them Maxwell's equations even tho it was Faraday and Heaviside that pretty much came up with them.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook




Similar Discussions: Maxwell's equations
  1. Maxwell's equations (Replies: 15)

  2. 2013 Maxwell Medal (Replies: 1)

Loading...