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MBTS : Molecular Biology Technical Series

  1. Sep 20, 2003 #1

    Another God

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    I have been considering starting a series of threads (don't worry, there won't be too many of them) all relating to some Technical aspects of Molecular Biology. I have thought of doing this for 2 reasons. Firstly, some people might be interested in learning about various topics in molecular biology, and secondly, its a good way for me to study the stuff I am supposed to know.

    So, if anyone is interested, feel free to ask me to write on topics you are interested in. Feel free to ask anything....



    The first topic I intend to write on is Telomeres. This is hardly the basics, but I will have an exam on Telomeres in a few weeks, so its relevent for me .

    If you want a quick introductory to the basic of Molecular Biology, read the 'What's the connection?' thread.

    (actually, those posts might be a good starting thread for the series, I might even copy them and repost them as their own thread.?)
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 21, 2003 #2
    I would be a very vehemnt reader! I'd love to learn more about Molecular Biology, especially considering I havn't really studied the subject in any depth.

    I'll be excitedly waiting!
     
  4. Sep 23, 2003 #3

    Monique

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    Hi Beren, anything in particular you'd like to know?
     
  5. Sep 23, 2003 #4
    Well, there's nothing truly specific I'd like to be covered. Just whatever you choose to go over, more or less.

    Actually, if you could explain about histones a little, I'd be much appreciative. Actually, Chromosome structure in general is a subject I'm lacking a terrible amount of knowledge in.
     
  6. Sep 27, 2003 #5
    Finally....somebody decides to do it...
    i amm waaiting for soooooooooo long....
    but can u start from the basics? my grasp of the topic is not too good....
     
  7. Sep 27, 2003 #6

    Another God

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    OK. Almost there. I'll start by reposting the stuff fromt he thread 'Whats the connection' (that outlines the 4 main types of molecules that make a cell functional.)

    I won't post them in this thread though, so make sure u check out the biology forum every now and then and look out for threads that start with MBTS...
     
  8. Sep 28, 2003 #7

    Monique

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    I am stuying for an exam right now, to be taken one-on-one with the professor so the pressure is on :) it is part of a tutor course so I'll have to know every detail :)

    So when I am done covering the necessary chapters (including cell signaling which is REALLY though) I'll get back doing some recreational studying for you guys.

    Till then!
     
  9. Oct 4, 2003 #8
    take yr time....i haf an exam on aniwae
     
  10. Oct 4, 2003 #9

    Another God

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    LOL, i have 2 this week and a lab report....so It won't be until after them :) (I might be able to write some stuff on what I have just been studying. :smile:)
     
  11. Oct 4, 2003 #10

    Another God

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    One of the topics in one of my exams includes protein sorting.... yeah, its complicated alright. Incredibly interesting too.
     
  12. Oct 4, 2003 #11

    Monique

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    This proffessor is crazy, he made the exam especially for me and asked questions like:
    -name the differences between DNA and RNA
    -which enzyme transcribes DNA to RNA, name four RNA catagories
    -what is a promotor of a gene
    -in which direction does RNA synthesis take place
    -how far does the bacterial promotor lie from the trancription start (ok, that one I actually learned in the past weeks: -10 and -35)
    -what is an exon and an intron
    -describe FRET and which information can be gotten from the technique
    -describe a pulse-chase method

    !molecular biology is my expertise!

    I didn't know whether to be insulted or be happy with such questions, the questions got a little harder later on btw:

    -what is the role of cyclin dependent kinases in the cell cyclus. Give a schematic model of the essentials of cell-cycle control system. (?schematic model?)

    -give the molecular basis of MAP-kinases (?what is the question here? .. molecular basis? euhh they are mitogen-activating-protein-kinases?)
     
  13. Oct 4, 2003 #12

    Another God

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    I guess there was a point to the first few questions in light of the harder latter ones. If you are going to start tutoring, there is nothing worse than having a student ask you a simple question and you realising that can't actually remember the answer!!!

    I've never heard of FRET of pulse-chase method before though.
     
  14. Oct 5, 2003 #13

    Monique

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    FRET is the mechanism of action used in the TaqMan assay (genotyping of alleles) but it can also be used to visualize protein interactions. It basically stands for Fluorescent Resonance Energy Transfer. You have two molecules labeled with a fluorescent dye, specifically chosen so that the emission spectrum of the one equals the absorptive spectrum of the other. So say, hypothetically, you have a green fluorescing protein, you follow it in the cells, when it come in close proximity to another fluorescent molecule with which it is to show interaction, the green photons of that molecule will be transferred to the other, which will start fluorescing red by the energy transfer. In TaqMan a quencher is used together with the fluofore, DNA polymerase will eat up the fragment which is hybridized to the DNA, releasing the fluofore and the quencher, thus causing fluorescence of that particular allele.

    And the pulse-chase it quite simple too, in following proteins in the cell. You shortly expose the cells to 14C, for instance which is incorporated. Then you stop the exposure the the radiactive compound. You take an autoradiogram to see where are the molecules are at, you wait a while, take another autoradiogram, etc and so you can see the molecules being transported through the cell. The labeling can be made very specific with antibodies for instance, and if you are interested in a certain subcellular compartment, you make a tale on the molecule which will make it go there.
     
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