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Measuring method's accuracy

  1. Sep 10, 2008 #1
    Can anyone please tell me which one of the following is the most accurate method of Volume measurement for 6 mL of water (density= 1g/mL): Graduated Cylinder, Pipet, or Buret. Also, how can you explain your answer. Every help would be appreciated.
     
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  3. Sep 11, 2008 #2

    Borek

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    Staff: Mentor

    Have you ever measured volume using these methods? Or have you at least seen them used? Neglecting accuracy for a moment - which will be the most convenient? Why? Which will be the least convenient? Why?

    And I am not asking about some theoretical stuff, but about your gut feelings.
     
  4. Sep 11, 2008 #3

    First, thank you for replying my question. Secondly, I think the pipet will be the most convenient method because we can control the flowing of water easily with the wheel. The cylinder will be the least convenient because it hard to dispense the extra water if we overpour water in it. So , I think the Pipet should be the most accurate measuring method because it yield the least percent of error.

    If I were wrong, please tell me. Thanks again!
     
    Last edited: Sep 11, 2008
  5. Sep 11, 2008 #4

    chemisttree

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    Are you familiar with the terms "to contain" and "to deliver"? (and why would that be relevant?) Is the graduated cylinder graduated in 0.1 mL increments? Is the pipette even graduated at all? Is the pipette calibrated to contain a particular volume? (ie. is it a volumetric pipette?) Are the buret's graduations in 0.1 mL increments?
     
  6. Sep 11, 2008 #5
    Hi,
    I think I can distinguish between the terms "to contain" and "to deliver" :) The graduated cylinder graduated in 1.0 mL increments (error: +/- 0.5mL), and both buret and pipette are graduated in 0.1 mL (error: +/- 0.05mL).
     
  7. Sep 12, 2008 #6

    Borek

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    At this moment you may safely assume that one of these devices is less acurate. Honestly, I am not sure if anything more can be done (that's assuming that you are right about +/- 0.05 mL error, that's not necesarilly true; it may depend on particular glass).
     
  8. Sep 12, 2008 #7

    JGK

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    It will also depend on the classification of the volumetric glassware and the temperature etc

    Class A glassware is produced to tighter (volumetric) controls than class B glassware. these
     
  9. Sep 18, 2008 #8
    Thanks to all!
     
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