Metal rubber

  • Thread starter mather
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  • #1
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Hello!
Is there a metallic material that can have the elasticity properties of a rubber band?
Thanks!
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
Danger
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Why would you want such a thing? You can simulate the appearance of metal with paints or powders, if that's what you want. Electrical conductivity can be achieved in polymers, if that's needed. As for actual stretchy metal, I don't think so. Even mylar balloons don't stretch, and that's just extremely thin aluminum.
 
  • #3
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I want metal's properties regarding their behaviour to temperature, to magnetism, to strength and that can be fairly unbreakable
 
  • #4
Danger
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I want metal's properties regarding their behaviour to temperature, to magnetism, to strength and that can be fairly unbreakable
oboy...

Okay, then... no two metals have the same properties in regard to all of those fields, so your first step should be to choose which one best suits your requirements. Once you've done that, it will be possible to try to figure out something about integrating those properties into a flexible medium. (I don't anticipate success, but there's no harm in trying.)
 
  • #5
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oboy...

Okay, then... no two metals have the same properties in regard to all of those fields, so your first step should be to choose which one best suits your requirements. Once you've done that, it will be possible to try to figure out something about integrating those properties into a flexible medium. (I don't anticipate success, but there's no harm in trying.)
i want to try, but the problem is i dont know where to start :D
 
  • #6
Danger
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I'm not a metallurgist, but there are a few hanging around PF. In order to get any help, you pretty much have to specify what characteristics you want in regard to thermal tolerance, magnetic properties, etc. that you categorized earlier. For instance, does it have to be extremely magnetizable, such as neodymium, or magnetic-resistance like stainless steel? What do you consider to be "temperature-resistant"? A frying pan conforms to that, but wouldn't be suitable for a lot of industrial applications.
One other thing to consider is that what a lot of people consider to be "strength" is incompatible with "elasticity".
It would be best if you tell us exactly what you want to build with this substance.
 
  • #7
Get yourself a rubber band ... and spray paint it with a metallic color :)
 
  • #8
Danger
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Get yourself a rubber band ... and spray paint it with a metallic color :)
And exactly how does that meet his thermal, magnetic, strength, and conductive requirements? If you recall, I mentioned that as a possibility in my first post, if his only desire was to have something that appeared from a distance to be metallic. Such is not the case.
 
  • #9
jim hardy
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....elasticity properties of a rubber band?
perhaps a spring?

http://photos3-cdn.fotosearch.com/bthumb/CSP/CSP593/k5930183.jpg [Broken]
 
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  • #10
Danger
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perhaps a spring?
That was my first idea, but I can't think of one that mimics the properties of an elastic. A braid such as the sheath of a high-performance fuel line can stretch and compress under external influence, but isn't "springy". The Slinky or whatever in your illustration is springy to some limited extent, but doesn't come close to matching the physical attributes of an elastic in either its relaxed or expanded state.
 
  • #12
Danger
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That appears to be a psychoceramic site, but I'll leave it up to the Mentors to decide.
 
  • #14
Danger
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Rather than start a new thread about a different non-existent material every 5 minutes, why don't you just tell us what the hell you're trying to achieve all in one big question? This is becoming annoying.
 
  • #15
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Rather than start a new thread about a different non-existent material every 5 minutes, why don't you just tell us what the hell you're trying to achieve all in one big question? This is becoming annoying.
What annoys you exactly?
Isnt this forum about chemistry, engineering and marerials?
anyway, it is not a single question and i have thought many applications, i just need to know if such materials exist or can be developed
 
  • #16
Danger
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You're obviously trying to invent something that requires a huge variety of things that either don't exist or are so exotic that most people have never heard of them. You keep running us around in circles trying to figure out what you want, when you could simplify the whole process and just tell us what you're trying to do. Nobody would ask about colour-shifting materials, stretchy metal, telescoping material that doesn't bend, and electrically-altered refractive indices randomly, with no purpose in mind. I don't care whether it's a weapon of mass destruction or a new cat toy; just quit making us guess.
Given your previous questions about polyfoams and whatnot, it's clear that you have a very active mind, but even then a lot of your questions were vague. I honestly don't mean to hurt your feelings or discourage you, but it is very frustrating to try decyphering your intent time after time.

edit: Oh, crap! Please tell me that you're not trying to build an invisible Iron Man suit...
 

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