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Metal Workshop?

  1. Jan 7, 2015 #1
    Hello. I just want to know if you guys know a website, place, or store where you can use their apparatus and work on a stainless steel plate? Right now I'm planning to create a Hydrogen generator using water with catalyst. Thank you.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 7, 2015 #2
    Where are you located? Tech Shop has a few facilities scattered around the States. For a monthly or yearly free you can use the equipment, think you may need to take their class on a particular machine before they let you operate it.
     
  4. Jan 7, 2015 #3
    I'm located at CA San Jose. I've heard of them. Do you know their website or so? Thanks
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 7, 2015
  5. Jan 7, 2015 #4

    Doug Huffman

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    TechShop.ws in San Jose, Ca.
     
  6. Jan 7, 2015 #5
    thank you so much...
     
  7. Jan 7, 2015 #6

    Doug Huffman

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    Rose Garden District, Hedding Street, through elementary school I planted the tallest tree on Hedding Street.
     
  8. Jan 7, 2015 #7
    I'm also in SJ. I took a few machine shop classes at De Anza for my projects. Might be less expensive than Tech Shop?

    Ouch: Bit of egg on my face. Just realized what forum this was posted too and what you may be trying to do. Ignore me.
     
    Last edited: Jan 7, 2015
  9. Jan 7, 2015 #8
    Great though :D .Btw i'm planning to make a Hydrogen generator that's why I need to work on meta works. Is there some hardware shops around Sj that could help out though?
     
  10. Jan 7, 2015 #9

    berkeman

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    Okay, these last 2 posts are weird. @RNickl -- say which what?

    @deuel18 -- I thought that you were going to use the TechShop in SJ. What's up?
     
  11. Jan 7, 2015 #10
    Its not that expensive to make a hydrogen generator. The only problem is the proper shape and size of the stainless steel plate. Thats all.
     
  12. Jan 7, 2015 #11

    berkeman

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    Or just use glassware, right? What volume of H2 do you want to make per day?
     
  13. Jan 7, 2015 #12
    Considering a car engine, maybe about 2.8 liters in less than a minute (rough estimate). And glassware can't do the job. The container can be glassware but the Stainless Steel Plate will act as the Hydrogen Fuel Cell generator while submerged in water.
     
  14. Jan 7, 2015 #13

    Bystander

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    Four hundred amps?!! You might want to rethink your time frame.
     
  15. Jan 7, 2015 #14
    Is that how it works? I believe it depends on the configuration of the generator like the surface area of the plate, its size, how good the catalyst is, and so on...although I'm still in conceptual procedure. Everything is acceptable.
     
  16. Jan 7, 2015 #15

    Bystander

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    It depends upon how many electrons you have to pass to hydrolyze 0.1 to 0.15 mol water in a minute or a little less.
     
  17. Jan 7, 2015 #16

    berkeman

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    Stainless steel as a catalyst? I'm no chemist, but that sounds like an oxymoron...
     
  18. Jan 7, 2015 #17
    I didnt meant to say the stainless steel as catalyst. The catalyst I'm talking about could be like anything that would make the water very conductive. Like Baking Soda or Salt or something else. But that's not hard to do once the setup is laid out.
    Thats the part I need to know. I passed my Chemistry but I kinda forgot those calculations. I need to restudy those.
     
  19. Jan 7, 2015 #18

    Bystander

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    A very "exciting" and effective one for some reactions that shall remain unidentified. Works for electrolysis. Lousy as a fuel cell electrode.
     
  20. Jan 8, 2015 #19
    The ones I've seen on you tube use stainless washers a s stainless is very hard to machine.
     
  21. Jan 8, 2015 #20
    these are small ones. But you can use stainless steel plate to produce more.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 8, 2015
  22. Jan 8, 2015 #21

    Doug Huffman

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    I have been near electrolytic oxygen/hydrogen generators, though never responsible for their operation or maintenance. Submarine sailors become inured to lots of the alarms on their ships, like salinity alarms and temperature alarms. But not the oxygen generator alarm or the anti-submarine alarms.

    The O2 generator was nicknamed The Bomb for the potentially hazardous effects of 3000 psi gasses and high electrical currents. My particular vessel carried five-thousand chlorate candles. Once a danger tag was violated and they were wetted with seawater and each one had to be rinsed and dried and restowed, it took about a week.
     
  23. Jan 8, 2015 #22
    Interesting. What happens to the H2 after the electrolysis? Is it dumped back to the seawater?
     
  24. Jan 8, 2015 #23

    Doug Huffman

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    Yes, just so. The H2 discharge is to an auxiliary cooling seawater, though notably the actual piping penetration is IIRC after the ASW hull and backup valves for the corrosive effects of HCl - the gaseous discharge had its own hull and backup valves.

    There is also a high temperature catalyst burner intended to burn atmospheric CO and H2 (as from the huge Pb-acid battery) to CO2 and H2O.
     
  25. Jan 8, 2015 #24

    berkeman

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    Why do you want to make Hydrogen for your car? Do you have a cheap source of electrical power that you are trying to find uses for?
     
  26. Jan 11, 2015 #25
    When hydrogen is added to the mix you get more complete combustion. The emission tests show a cleaner burn. Hot rodders love it.
     
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