Methanol's solubility and acidity

  • Thread starter credico
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I was reading the chem book I have and it says that methanol is a non-electrolyte. Since the methanol's oxygen has a higher electron density than hydrogen, that hydrogen has a partial positive charge. The book also says that methanol is infinitely soluble. The only reason it's soluble to begin with is the hydroxide attached to the CH3, so, at best, wouldn't the methanol be soluble only up to the point when the oxygens on the water molecules run out of free pairs of electrons?

Also, when that hydrogen on the methanol is taken by the water, hydronium and CH3O- is formed in water. The book says it's a non-electrolyte. I'm guessing that the equilibrium between the methanol and water lies so far to the left that there is essentially only product, so it's conductivity is really, really low... but at what point does a reaction's equilibrium lie enough toward the product side that it can complete a circuit?

If the methanol and water reaction lies mostly toward reactants, than I really don't get how it is infinitely soluble. What's the difference between a reaction with water and solubility?

Thanks!
 

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