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Microgravity environment at home?

  1. May 31, 2005 #1
    I know this is pretty dumb... but is there a way I can make a microgravity environment at home?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. May 31, 2005 #2

    Integral

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    Sure, we live in micro gravity... On the larger scale of things.
     
  4. May 31, 2005 #3

    Danger

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    Ignore Integral; he's very old and delusional. :tongue:

    The short and dirty answer is 'no'. The longer and far more expensive one is to cultivate friendships in the aviation community and get someone to provide a 'zero-gee' parabola in an aeroplane. You might get a couple of freebies, but eventually you're gonna have to chip in for fuel.


    edit: Integral; I know that somewhere, sometime, you're gonna get me for that... but really, do you think that I could let that go by?
     
    Last edited: May 31, 2005
  5. May 31, 2005 #4
    Well the real answer is "it depends on what exactly you are talking about".
     
  6. May 31, 2005 #5

    Andrew Mason

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    Sure, but it won't last very long. If you toss something up to the ceiling and let it fall to the floor, you will have about a second of microgravity.

    AM
     
  7. May 31, 2005 #6

    Integral

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    Any object in a free fall trajectory experiences a 0 gravitational reaction force, which means it is "weightless". I believe that experiments in orbit, have shown that the in comparison to other forces acting (the atomic scale forces) , the earths surface is a micro gravity environment.
     
  8. May 31, 2005 #7

    Danger

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    I see what you're saying. (That's not a mixed metaphor; I read lips.) The point of his original question, however, would appear to be that he wants to experiment with something that requires even less gravity than we normally experience here.
     
  9. May 31, 2005 #8
    Someone said spinning fast would kinda do it... is this true?
     
  10. May 31, 2005 #9
    No, theres no logical correlation between spinning and gravitation.
     
  11. May 31, 2005 #10
    No, it's the other way around. In a zero (or micro-gravity) environment, spinning can be used to simulate a non-zero-gravity environment.
     
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