Microplastics concern

  • Thread starter kenny1999
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  • #1
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Main Question or Discussion Point

I have read some articles about microplastics, which state that we could breathe in microplastics from the indoor air.

Generally speaking, if we have more home products made of plastics (of any common types), are
we breathing in more microplastic every day?

By the way, how is airborne microplastic formed? Is it that any plastics products would naturally release microplastic from its surface on day 1 or did they only release microplastics when they are stressed by horrible environment or wear from long-term use?
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
berkeman
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I have read some articles about microplastics, which state that we could breathe in microplastics from the indoor air.
Could you provide some links to your reading? Preferably from reputable medical websites. Thanks. :smile:
 
  • #3
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I have read some articles about microplastics, which state that we could breathe in microplastics from the indoor air.
Sure.

Generally speaking, if we have more home products made of plastics (of any common types), are
we breathing in more microplastic every day?
It is more related to clothing and such: also, contains both natural plastic-like materials like cotton or wool and artificial fibers.

The problem is, that so far I could not find any reliable source that the harm it can do would be related to plastics instead of the well known troubles coming from the 'dusty' air.
 
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  • #4
jim mcnamara
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Here is an explanation about primary and secondary pollutants.
http://www.differencebetween.net/science/difference-between-primary-pollutants-and-secondary-pollutants/

1. microplastics are not that common but fall under the particulates class in the link above for primary pollutants

2. Secondary pollutants form faster in the presense of particulates. Small amounts of very tiny particles of any (somwhat) inert sort, kind of act like a platform to aggregate other particles of nasty molecules. These new pollutants are secondary pollutants and are sometimes labelled SAO's. Example: This can happen in your kitchen. Like the smoke from very overheated smoking oil that ends up forming goo on the walls, mixed with the aerosols from frying.

Here is a discussion of why smoking oil (oil above the smoke point) occurs.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Smoke_point
 
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  • #5
gleem
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