MIH goes to the hippy soap shop

Moonbear
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She's hella smart, for sure. She's even bigger now. We need to figure out a way to trim her hooves as they are impeding her walking.
Get a good pair of hoof shears and have a vet or local farmer show you how to do it. Let her run around in the mud a bit so her hooves are soft the day you're going to trim them; it makes the cutting easier. Otherwise, once you're shown how to do it, it's not that hard.
 
Ivan Seeking
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On another note, I was researching Ivan's algae-oil
Thanks, but I didn't actually create the stuff. :biggrin:

the other day and noticed that one of the byproducts was glycerin. Now I've purchased glycerin soap when I ran out of hippie soap on occasion. Do you think the diesel glycerin byproduct could be used for making soap? Or do you think I'd end up smelling like I've just changed the oil in my car, after taking my bath?
Glycerin has in fact been one of the byproducts that can be sold after making biodiesel. Unfortunately, the last time that I checked - about six months ago - being that the biodiesel industry had reached the status of being a mainstream commercial enterprise, the bottom had dropped out of the glycerin market, so I don't think it yields significant revenues; at least not nearly as good as it once did. In short: We need much more biodiesel than we do glycerin. So I guess the opportunity is in products made from glycerin, such as fancy soaps, rather than the wholesale end of things.
 
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We've got shears, and know how to cut hooves, its just the part of not scaring her, and I've heard it can turn a good pig mean. My plan is to get one or two people to rub her side and belly, which always leads to her laying down and rolling onto her back a little, and having another do the trimming.
 
Ivan Seeking
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We had pigmy goats, and they had lines in the hooves that you could follow... I guess pretty much like growth lines in trees. So as long as we were careful to only trim down one or two sets of lines, we were okay. But in order to trim them, I had to tackle the up to 90 pound suckers, put them in a double half-nelson with a twist and a Hamel-Camel, wrestle, and after a time...eventually, I could finally get the advantage. Then, while I endured the screaming in my ear, and the second generation cud burps in my face, Tsu could trim the hooves.

Nothing to it.
 
Tsu
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It was not easy to trim goat hooves while laughing hysterically at the goats not just screaming and burping at Ivan, but SCREAMING! and BURPING! at him. :rofl:

A friend of mine raises goats and makes and sells goats milk soaps and lotions. They're very nice.
 
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Yeah, we've got or have had both full size and pygmy goats, two mini donkeys, a few horses, plus chickens that need trimming.
 
Tsu
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OK. I'll bite. HOW do you trim your CHICKENS????
 
Tsu
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...and...wouldn't that be hippy DIPPY soap shop??
 
Moonbear
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We had pigmy goats, and they had lines in the hooves that you could follow... I guess pretty much like growth lines in trees. So as long as we were careful to only trim down one or two sets of lines, we were okay. But in order to trim them, I had to tackle the up to 90 pound suckers, put them in a double half-nelson with a twist and a Hamel-Camel, wrestle, and after a time...eventually, I could finally get the advantage. Then, while I endured the screaming in my ear, and the second generation cud burps in my face, Tsu could trim the hooves.

Nothing to it.
It's easier when you're their pimp. They'd let me lead them anywhere (because 90% of the time, they were going to "get some" when I led them to the other pens) so I could just put a halter on them, tie them to a post, lean against one side to keep them still against a wall, and pick up one foot at a time to trim. Sheep require two people, but are easier to do, because you can just flip them onto their butts and one person holds them while the other runs around trimming the hooves all sticking out.

I never actually tried trimming pig hooves though. If they'll stand still, you could probably try the same approach I used for goats of just reaching down and picking up one foot at a time to trim while giving them a wall to lean against for support. If not, yeah, any trick to get them to just lie on their side sounds good, or else it might require a little sedative from the vet as a last resort I suppose (that's what they do with horses).
 
lisab
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We had pigmy goats, and they had lines in the hooves that you could follow... I guess pretty much like growth lines in trees. So as long as we were careful to only trim down one or two sets of lines, we were okay. But in order to trim them, I had to tackle the up to 90 pound suckers, put them in a double half-nelson with a twist and a Hamel-Camel, wrestle, and after a time...eventually, I could finally get the advantage. Then, while I endured the screaming in my ear, and the second generation cud burps in my face, Tsu could trim the hooves.

Nothing to it.
:rofl:

Ours would give up fighting as soon as we rolled them onto their backs (which wasn't easy to do!). The big Angoras were easier to flip than the pygmies, surprisingly. Those little guys are incredibly strong. And stubborn!
 
Moonbear
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:rofl:

Ours would give up fighting as soon as we rolled them onto their backs (which wasn't easy to do!). The big Angoras were easier to flip than the pygmies, surprisingly. Those little guys are incredibly strong. And stubborn!
And lower center of gravity. :biggrin:
 
Tsu
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:rofl:

Ours would give up fighting as soon as we rolled them onto their backs (which wasn't easy to do!). The big Angoras were easier to flip than the pygmies, surprisingly. Those little guys are incredibly strong. And stubborn!

Yeah!! Tell us about it!!!! :rofl: Ours gave up fighting (after a minute or so of wrestling with Ivan :biggrin:) but they kept the screaming and burping going until the last hoof was trimmed. Poor Ivan. :biggrin:
 
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Yeah!! Tell us about it!!!! :rofl: Ours gave up fighting (after a minute or so of wrestling with Ivan :biggrin:) but they kept the screaming and burping going until the last hoof was trimmed. Poor Ivan. :biggrin:
You need those fainting goats.
 
Tsu
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Ivan Seeking
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Those little guys are incredibly strong. And stubborn!
Yes they are. As long as they can't use their legs, they are pretty much helpless. But if they managed to get the slip on me and got a leg loose, it could be quite a wrestling match. And of course the first few times probably looked like something from the Keystone Cops, but we got better with time.

We knew there were easier ways to do it, and really we had a pretty workable system, but those burps are tooooooooo much! And they do scream like a stuck pig, so to speak. :uhh:
 
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