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I Milligauss unit?

  1. Sep 12, 2016 #1
    this may be a stupid question, but does anyone know the conversation from millgauss to hertz.
    Let me explain because I feel it's made up.

    Someone posted this on another forum I frequent.
    http://www.monsterfishkeepers.com/forums/threads/emf-radiation-aquarium-pumps.674555/

    I didn't know what a milligauss was. I doubt the filter is anything to worry about but I had no idea what a milligauss was so I started googling. And didn't really find anything.

    I found this that says 1 microtesla = 10 milligauss. But it also says microgauss is a unit to refer to lower frequencies on the em spectrum. That's wrong, right?
    http://www.monsterfishkeepers.com/forums/threads/emf-radiation-aquarium-pumps.674555/

    Am I crazy?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 12, 2016 #2

    davenn

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    there is no direct conversion as they are measuring different things

    Gauss = magnetic field strength
    Hertz = frequency

    garbage .... If you live in a colder climate place, your electric blanket for a bed would be much worse than this
    or your mains powered alarm clock on the table beside your bed


    Dave
     
  4. Sep 12, 2016 #3
    I've been googling "milligauss" and I couldn't find anything.
    I've never seen that unit before.
     
  5. Sep 12, 2016 #4

    Redbelly98

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    There is no conversion, since milligauss and hertz are measures of different physical quantities.

    Milligauss is a measure of magnetic field strength. Hertz is a measure of frequency, and is synonymous with "cycles per second".
     
  6. Sep 12, 2016 #5

    davenn

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    1 Gauss, 1 milliGauss, 1 uGauss (microGauss) etc as the units get smaller
    same for Tesla ... mT, uT, nT (nT = nanoTesla ... very small)

    Teslas are the commonly used units, here's one that I keep an eye on daily

    Interplanetary Mag. Field
    Btotal: 6.3 nT
    Bz: 4.3 nT south


    Dave
     
  7. Sep 12, 2016 #6
    You learn something new every day.
    I bet I have heard it once... And only once lol.
     
  8. Sep 12, 2016 #7

    davenn

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    yup we sure do .....
    I love the Physics Forums .... I wander through a lot of threads on topics I know next to nothing about
    I the many years I have been on here, its been a wonderful learning experience

    D
     
  9. Sep 13, 2016 #8

    Andy Resnick

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    I checked the URLs (they are 'not even wrong'), but as usual, there is some kernel of science buried in the garbage:

    1) electric motors (and other electric equipment) will generate magnetic fields. These fields are typically milligauss or less:

    http://www.who.int/peh-emf/project/mapnatreps/nznrl_emfbooklet2008.pdf

    2) Gauss can sometimes be converted into a frequency- this is NMR, and the frequency is the Larmor frequency. It's typically in MHz for NMR magnets- totally unrelated to #1 above.
     
  10. Sep 13, 2016 #9

    Redbelly98

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    Alternatively, Guass can be "converted" into the cyclotron frequency, which will have an entirely different value. And, both Larmor and cyclotron frequencies are different for different particles. So, the term converted is being used here in a very different sense than, say, when converting feet into meters.

    As you said, totally unrelated to post #1.
     
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