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Mind over Money (NOVA)

  1. Apr 27, 2010 #1
    I'm watching right now on NOVA (PBS) :

    Here's the website
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Apr 28, 2010 #2

    Ivan Seeking

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    That was excellent. I was going to post a link but it isn't available for viewing online yet.
     
  4. Apr 28, 2010 #3

    turbo

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    I tried tuning in last night, but unfortunately this is one of PBS' "begging and pleading weeks" so regular prime-time programming is all superseded. I'll have to see if I can watch it on-line.
     
  5. Apr 28, 2010 #4
    I found this podcast: http://castroller.com/podcasts/NovaSciencenow/1601226-The%20Deciding%20Factor [Broken]

    Jennifer Lerner,a social psychologist at Harvard University, studied the effects of sadness and disgust on economic behavior.

    Read more Here

    Related topics:

    Retailers love it when you get the blues

    http://www.scienceblog.com/cms/why-play-losing-game-study-uncovers-why-low-income-people-buy-lottery-tickets-16966.html [Broken]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  6. Apr 28, 2010 #5

    Ivan Seeking

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  7. Apr 29, 2010 #6

    turbo

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    I just watched it, and the show is a pretty good one. One thing that was quite dismaying was how few people recognized the housing bubble for what it was. The people betting against the mortgage-based securities that they bundled and sold knew what was coming, but the market as a whole acted like everything was rosy.

    My wife and I bought this little cabin with a nice garden spot and put our big in-town house on the market in 2005. After some long talks and number-crunching, my friend (the real-estate agent that sold our old house) and his wife bought a little place a few miles from here and put their big renovated farmhouse on the market. We both sold near the top of the market and watched as the people who bought our places defaulted and lost the houses to foreclosure. Our old house is back on the market, and the finance company is willing to take a $40K+ loss just to unload it.

    Some of our friends looked at our smaller houses and acted like we were nuts for down-sizing so drastically. Then the housing crash came, and Bob and I didn't look quite so stupid, after all. We didn't have any "inside" information, just the realization that the market could not sustain the rate of growth that it was experiencing in 2005. He soon left real-estate and went back to operating heavy equipment - real estate agents are starving, still.
     
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