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Minimum bending radius for a tube

  1. Aug 3, 2005 #1
    How do you calculate the minimum bend radious for a tube?

    Its a SS tube and we want to bend as small a radius as possible....
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 3, 2005 #2

    FredGarvin

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    The standard I always follow is 4 times the OD. I'll see if I can't dig up a relationship that is a bit more accurate to include wall thickness.

    BTW...what size tube? Is there any reason you can't use a 90° fitting?
     
    Last edited: Aug 3, 2005
  4. Aug 3, 2005 #3

    Q_Goest

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    I have 3 Swagelok tube benders under my desk. The 1/4" and 1/2" are both the standard 3:1 radius, and the 3/8" is a standard also with a bend radius of just a bit more than 3:1. I believe the Parker ones are the same.

    If you can't use an elbow as Fred suggests, there are weld fittings, or you might even consider making it a mitre joint, though that's very uncommon and generally not good practice.
     
  5. Aug 3, 2005 #4
    The Tube is a 7/32 OD im not sure of the Wall thickness but the bend we need to make is about a .41 diamiter curve and it has to go 180Deg.

    Bassiacly a U shape. the .41 is the id of the U.

    But so far what I hear is the bend is way to small for the tube :cry:
     
  6. Aug 3, 2005 #5

    Q_Goest

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    Why not just make up a mandrel and try it? You don't have much to loose. I'd be a bit concerned about hoop stress because when you bend a tube, the ID will thicken but the OD will thin. If you're trying to meet a piping code, and especially if this is a mass produced item, it would be wise to apply minimum wall thickness to the thinned OD of the tube. That said, what pressure are you going to, what material is the tube made from and what are you flowing through it?
     
  7. Aug 3, 2005 #6

    FredGarvin

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    Questions:

    First of all...7/32? Couldn't you make this easy and make the tube Ø.250?
    What's the set up like? Where is this tube going? If you can give us a general idea of what the plumbing is doing we may be able to find an alternate method.
     
    Last edited: Aug 3, 2005
  8. Aug 3, 2005 #7

    Danger

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    If it's a low-pressure, non-reactive environment, plastic might be easier to use... but it seems unlikely if the first choice was stainless.
     
  9. Aug 4, 2005 #8

    Clausius2

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    What about taking a look at the Crane paper?? :rofl: :rofl: :rofl:
     
  10. Aug 4, 2005 #9

    FredGarvin

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    Hardee-har-har. Go back to your tube now.
     
  11. Aug 4, 2005 #10
    Well to answer some of the questions...

    The size and material of the tubs can not be changed... Its for high pressure hydrogen.

    I have been trying it. I made a few mandrels and the tube always kinks. Even with Annelling it.

    Im pritty positive it cant be bent as tight as Im trying... I still have a few more things to try.

    Now Im trying to fill teh tube with a low temp solder before I bend it. Ill see how that works out....
     
  12. Aug 4, 2005 #11

    Q_Goest

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    LOL Maybe we need to perform an FEA analysis on it . . . <not>

    I've also heard of people packing sand inside. That might be a bit more practical. But if this is for high pressure hydrogen, I'd suggest doing some burst testing (hydrostatic) to ensure you still have the proper strength after forming. Are you familiar with ASME B31.3? I'd assume that was the right code if you're in the US. There are some others depending on what kind of system it is. If you're in Europe, they have an equivalent code for pressure rating.
     
  13. Aug 4, 2005 #12
    I tryed sand first... It didnt turn out so well...

    And as far as coad goes... We make up our own coad! We dont need no stinking ASME! =-P
     
  14. Aug 4, 2005 #13

    FredGarvin

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    I think you may be stuck having to use some fittings and doing a little rerouting. You could possibly use a small manifold...
     
  15. Aug 4, 2005 #14

    I keep trying to tell the head engener that :grumpy:
     
  16. Aug 5, 2005 #15

    Danger

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    I have no idea what strength issues this will insult, but what about either machining or casting the bend and then welding it to the rest of the tube?
     
  17. Aug 5, 2005 #16

    That would be a nice thing... But time and money wont allow for that =-(




    I would like to thank you all for your input :smile: I think we have come up with a solution. We are filling the tube with a low tep solder then bending it to a slightly larger diamiter. It seems to be working! :approve:
     
  18. Aug 6, 2005 #17

    Danger

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    Please keep us posted regarding your progress. Happy hunting.
     
  19. Aug 23, 2005 #18
    Well after my 2 week vacation.... I decided that the best thing to do was bending the tube after filling it with solder.

    The bends came out pritty good. It is just a pain in the ass to make. and I need to make a bunch of them. Thanks fer the help everyone! =-)
     
  20. Aug 23, 2005 #19

    FredGarvin

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    Hopefully you can get a small assembly line set up to ease the pain a bit. Glad it's working out.
     
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