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Minimum length in universe

  1. Jun 5, 2004 #1
    If dark energy increases its total energy in the universe by taking energy from gravitons, then the loss in energy of a graviton can be linked to the increase in size of the universe.If the smallest unit of space is 10^ -35 metres, this is the minimum that the universe expands in any one dimension and this size of expansion is caused by the weakest energy gravitons losing energy to dark energy.But the expansion locally here on Earth would be only 10 ^ -35 / 10 ^ 26 metres =
    10 ^ -61 metres.So surely the smallest unit of space in the universe can't be 10 ^ -35 metres?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 6, 2004 #2
    smallest length

    I actually belive the smallest theorized length would be a one dim string which is on the order of 10^-34 cm you see it is nearing plancks constant I believe and therfore can't get any smaller.
     
  4. Jun 6, 2004 #3

    Chronos

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    i believe the planck limit is more on the order of 10-43

    oops, talking about length, not time. :redface:
     
    Last edited: Jun 7, 2004
  5. Jun 6, 2004 #4

    selfAdjoint

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    There is no current reason to suppose the Planck length is a sharp lower bound on length. What happens there is that the Compton wave length of a Planck mass particle equals its Schwartzschild radius, so gravity an quantum are forced to acknowledge each other. Note that the LQG program succeeded in quantizing areas and volumes, but not length. "There are more things, Horatio, than are dreamt of in your philosophy."
     
  6. Jun 6, 2004 #5
    KURIOUS:
    If dark energy increases its total energy in the universe by taking energy from gravitons, then the loss in energy of a graviton can be linked to the increase in size of the universe.If the smallest unit of space is 10^ -35 metres, this is the minimum that the universe expands in any one dimension and this size of expansion is caused by the weakest energy gravitons losing energy to dark energy.But the expansion locally here on Earth would be only 10 ^ -35 / 10 ^ 26 metres =
    10 ^ -61 metres.So surely the smallest unit of space in the universe can't be 10 ^ -35 metres?

    KURIOUS:

    String theory would be out of the picture if the minimum length isn't 10^-35 metres -
    unless it could be transformed to match the change in minimum length.
     
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