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MIT acceptance chances

  1. Mar 1, 2010 #1
    Hi,

    MIT admissions decisions are coming up and I'm starting to get nervous so what do you think my chances are (be as cruel as necessary)?

    I'm an International Applicant and my SAT grades are:

    Math Level 2 - 800
    Physics - 800

    Critical Reading - 800
    Math - 800
    Writing - 600

    I skipped a year, learned calculus early in my life, I've been part of the Portuguese International Olympiads preparation team for the second year now and last year I ranked quite well at our National Physics Olympiads. And I swim quite regularly

    My midyear report grades (which range from 0 to 20) are all in the 19's except Portuguese (This term was really bad and I had a 8) and Project Area (12).

    My recommendation letters are very good


    Will this bad Portuguese term affect very much my chances of getting in?

    I'm sorry if the post looks like I'm bragging or something like that (I'm not) but I'm really anxious and I need some objective input (postive or negative).

    Thanks
     
    Last edited: Mar 1, 2010
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 1, 2010 #2
    I know you're probably looking for some reassurance, but I'm afraid we won't really be able to give it to you: the people deciding on your application are unlikely to be here, so we cannot provide any objective advice that will make any difference :smile:

    You've applied now and since, as you say, the decisions are coming soon and, as difficult as it may be, you should just try to forget about it and relax.

    Otherwise, you obviously know your grades are good and you have even added other things to your application besides this; you have done all you can.
     
  4. Mar 1, 2010 #3
    Doubt it, since midyear reports are mainly used to ensure that you aren't getting terrible grades in your senior year courses. International admissions are competitive, but as fasterthanjoao said, there's not much you can do but wait.
     
  5. Mar 1, 2010 #4
    Boa sorte!
     
  6. Mar 1, 2010 #5

    PhanthomJay

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    Many many years ago, I applied to MIT with a 700 math SAT and a 450 English SAT. My high school grades were excellent in the math and sciences, and average in the humanities. I made the waiting list. My brother also applied at the same time, with the same SAT scores and grades. He did not make the waiting list. Reason?: I interviewed better. Have you had an interview of any kind? It sure helps, but who knows, that was years ago. Best of luck. It is often said that if you want to go into Engineering, and can't make it to MIT, then any other University offering engineering courses will be as good as any.. Some employers prefer more practical common sense engineers versus those highly technically skilled but clueless in real world applications. Don't sweat it, what will be, will be.
     
  7. Mar 2, 2010 #6
    I had an interview and I think it went quite well.

    Thanks for the input
     
  8. Mar 2, 2010 #7

    lisab

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    Keep us posted, grizzlyjoker. Best of luck!
     
  9. Mar 2, 2010 #8
    Speaking as someone that went to MIT. The admissions process is extremely random. The problem is that there are 1000 places, there are more than 1000 qualified people, and so any criterion that you apply will leave out a lot of people that could do well there. One thing that concerns me and a lot of alumni is how bad the situations with undergraduate admissions is, and I don't know I could get in today.

    Something to remember is that MIT needs you more than you need them, and if you end up somewhere else, it really won't change things that much for you.
     
  10. Mar 2, 2010 #9
    There's also a pretty dark side to MIT that most alumni are aware of, which is the purpose of the interview. One thing that does happen to some freshmen is that they get onto campus and totally self-destruct, and a lot of the alumni interview is to see that this isn't likely to happen. It helps if you don't seem *too* eager to get into MIT.

    The basic problem is that for a lot of people, doing good in class is part of their self-identity, and when you end up somewhere, where you are struggling just to stay afloat, bad things happen to some people.
     
  11. Mar 2, 2010 #10
    Thanks for the advice. Just for curiosity: in what did you graduate?
     
  12. Mar 2, 2010 #11
    It doesn't matter where you start, but where you end up.


    Good luck!
     
  13. Mar 2, 2010 #12
    You can always try the Instituto Superior T├ęcnico, same level as MIT.
     
  14. Mar 2, 2010 #13
    Physics :-) :-) :-)
     
  15. Mar 4, 2010 #14
    I know someone to whose qualifications yours compare favorably, and she got into MIT. So, you have a chance. But keep in mind that, as everyone has already said, admissions at top schools are *very* random and unfair.
     
  16. Mar 4, 2010 #15

    G01

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    Unfortunately, nothing can ensure that you will be accepted to MIT. They reject many people who are more than qualified just because they don't have enough room.

    If you keep up working like you have been, you'll be successful no matter where you go to school. Stay positive. MIT, or for that matter any school, does not define who you are or how successful you will be. You do.

    I hope you get into MIT. I'm currently in grad school in Boston (not on the Cambridge side of the river) and love it here. It's a great place to live. However, trust me. It won't be the end of the world if you don't go to MIT. Good luck wherever you end up!
     
  17. Mar 5, 2010 #16
    I'm backing up pretty much everything that G01 said. How good you will become depends mostly on your work and effort to achieve whatever goals you have.

    The fact that you attended a top-notch school helps in the first few jobs, but gets insignificant in the long term, where the only thing that is going to make you stand out from the rest of the crowd is what you are good at, and what you've achieved.

    Good luck none the less ;)
     
  18. Mar 14, 2010 #17
    Rejected, guess an 8 isn't acceptable with such a tough competition. Still love MIT though.
     
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2010
  19. Mar 14, 2010 #18
    Aww man, I'm sorry to hear that. What were your other choices?
     
  20. Mar 15, 2010 #19
    Other than MIT my only choice is to stay here in portugal :cry:
     
  21. Mar 15, 2010 #20
    Portugal? http://www.mitportugal.org/ ? :tongue:

    Keep working hard and no matter where you go for undergrad the same options for grad school or whatever else will still be there. It's much less about luck at the next level. College is much more differentiating than high school. Just make sure you know what you need to do to get where you want to be, and you'll be fine. Not being accepted to MIT as an undergrad is certainly nothing to worry about.
     
  22. Mar 15, 2010 #21
    You're right. And I can always apply next year as a transfer student, right?
     
  23. Mar 15, 2010 #22
    Transferring is very unlikely and is usually a distraction and waste of time. I would concentrate on building your resume and keeping a high GPA for grad school. Decide what your resume needs to look like in 3-4 years, and make sure you get it there. Do you want to get a PhD? Keep your GPA up and get some research experience and faculty exposure (for recommendations). Do you want to become an executive in a company? Work on getting leadership and internship experience while getting some broad exposure to technical and nontechnical courses in school. Etc. If you need help figuring out what you need to do to reach a certain goal, this forum is one of a few places you could be asking, too.

    Going somewhere besides MIT does not disqualify you from any options after college. Honestly, the name of your undergrad institution rarely plays a significant role in much of anything. MIT may have more companies recruiting on campus, for example, but that just means you'll have to work a little harder on networking. It doesn't mean you won't be eligible for the same jobs.

    MIT used to always be a goal of mine in high school too. Now that I've graduated college and have a job, I'm debating whether attending MIT for grad school would even be worth the time compared to other options. Your perspective will change too, and if you work for it intelligently, you will have plenty of options in a few years.
     
  24. Mar 15, 2010 #23
    Unlikely since MIT isn't set up for undergraduate transfers. There is graduate school.

    Very strongly agree here. I don't think that the MIT name has ever really seriously helped me.
     
  25. Mar 15, 2010 #24
    There's plenty of other top schools. I got accepted to MIT, but I'm not likely to go anyways simply due to the cost (my parents want to pay almost nothing for my tuition). Have you applied to other strong physics/math programs out there like Harvard, Princeton, Caltech, Stanford, etc.? If so, don't despair just yet!

    About the interview, it has almost a negligible impact on your application. All of them are expected to garner positive reviews about the applicant, and it's only the truly exceptional ones that make a difference. But mostly, it can only hurt you because, after all, they're very subjective.
     
  26. Mar 15, 2010 #25
    I'm in the same boat I applied and got rejected as well, funny thing is my application is a lot like yours... national olympiad(physics)etc, but yours is better, personally I think that you should have been accepted but as it turns out they accepted less than 3% of int. applicants, anyways I have hope for Stanford and princeton though, if not U of T for me...(The one in Toronto)
     
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