Mixing Substances

  • Thread starter LeeBowers
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Mixing substances
Hello, my name is Lee. I am a design and electrical engineer and I am involved in a project where I have developed a piece of equipment that mixes substances, primarily two liquids.
My equipment is a rotational shaking machine. The liquids are put into a vessel which is then shook over a number of cycles.

My question is, is there a 'science' as to how long and in what manner liquids need to be agitated before they dilute into each other? I appreciate each substance has its own properties but am unaware of how to approach this in a theoretical manner.

My initial thought was there may be software applications where you could enter:
1. substances information - volume, properties, etc.
2. vessel information
3. ambient conditions
4. agitation manner (i have seen many types of agitation from rotational shake, centrifugal ,orbital, etc.
and then the application can give you a method.

Many thanks in advance for anyone responding to my question
With best regards,
Lee
 
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symbolipoint

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I have not any answer. The people who might best respond would be mechanical engineers. What you described should be relevant to mixing paints, which would be two or more liquids in either cans or drums. A machine holds these closed containers and does whatever shake pattern it is designed to make. Another not exactly the same kind of example is the mixing of powders or small-grained solids done in drums or cans.
 

jrmichler

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There is a lot of science for mixing liquids, solids, solids with liquids, liquids with gases, viscous liquids, viscous liquids with ....., etc. Two good sources are:

Perry's Chemical Engineers' Handbook. It's currently in the 9th Edition, however my 5th Edition has excellent information on mixing. Highly recommended that you get a copy for your library.

Unit Operations of Chemical Engineering. Currently in the 7th Edition, however my 3rd Edition also has excellent information on mixing. Also highly recommended. If you get only one book, get the Chemical Engineers' Handbook first.

I suspect that you will find that shake mixing is practical only for small amounts, such as cans of paint. But look into it, and let us know what you find.
 

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