1. Not finding help here? Sign up for a free 30min tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Quantum Modern Physics Introduction?

  1. Jul 11, 2015 #1
    Can someone recommend me a modern physics book, that includes introduction to all the different theories like quantum mechanics,quantum field theory,special relativity,general relativity,standard model,string,m-theory,supersymmetry,superstrings,quantum gravity,loop quantum gravity etc(if I missed any other theory) ,so that I can get essence of what each theory tries to explain,to what extent they are successful and wheres the problem(i.e. theory of everything).

    If you know any book that does this,Please let me know!
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jul 11, 2015 #2

    ShayanJ

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    You want to read only one book for all of these theories?!
    So, honestly, physics is not for you.
     
  4. Jul 11, 2015 #3
    Just "introduction" to all these theories.
     
  5. Jul 11, 2015 #4

    ShayanJ

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    Its just impossible. Such a book does not exist. You can't learn physics this way. If you're not willing to put enough effort and time, you can't learn anything. And the fact that you're looking for such a book, means you're aiming to invest much much less than what is needed for gaining only a minimum understanding of such theories. Come back when you are willing to invest more.
     
  6. Jul 11, 2015 #5

    Orodruin

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper
    Gold Member

    The point is that you have listed such a wide variety of theories. From theories whoch are well established and tested to theories which at this point are only hypotheses which may never be testable. No book is going to give you an introduction to all these subjects. The closest thing you will get would be some popularised texts, but these texts are not texts to learn anyhing from.
     
  7. Jul 11, 2015 #6

    atyy

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor

    Not everyone wants to be a professional physicist, so for those who just want popsci stuff like me, here are some things that I've found useful.
    [/URL]
    https://www.amazon.com/The-Road-Reality-Complete-Universe/dp/0679776311
    The Road to Reality: A Complete Guide to the Laws of the Universe Paperback
    by Roger Penrose

    https://www.amazon.com/Unified-Grand-Theoretical-Physics-Edition/dp/1439884463
    A Unified Grand Tour of Theoretical Physics
    Ian D. Lawrie

    http://math.ucr.edu/home/baez/books.html
    How to Learn Math and Physics
    John Baez

    http://www.staff.science.uu.nl/~gadda001/goodtheorist/index.html
    How to become a GOOD Theoretical Physicist
    Gerard 't Hooft
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 7, 2017
  8. Jul 13, 2015 #7
    Actually, there is an excellent book by Lee Smolin, named "The Trouble with Physics". On one hand, its prose, not a textbook; on other, it gives the reader an excellent exposition of the development of ideas in physics, starting from Copernicus and Kepler, analysing any significant milestone since, and introducing all the key notions of the contemporary string theory in a digestible way. I am half way through this book, and it has given me a clear roadmap (perhaps not balanced) of what's going on in the last 30 years of high-energy physics. It teaches one to think of physical ideas with clarity and objectiveness. I totally love it.
     
  9. Jul 14, 2015 #8
    In my opinion:

    Modern Physics/Serway

    meets your requirements

    It's an excellent book ,very well written !
     
  10. Jul 14, 2015 #9
    Why can't you learn things from popular books?
     
  11. Jul 14, 2015 #10

    Orodruin

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper
    Gold Member

    Because they skip vital details in how the theory is constructed and how it makes predictions. As such, you cannot learn anything about the actual theory. At best, you can learn about the theory, but not enough to judge its merits.
     
  12. Jul 14, 2015 #11
    That makes sense. But there isn't anything wrong w learning about stuff than delving right into the theory of stuff
     
  13. Jul 14, 2015 #12

    Orodruin

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper
    Gold Member

    As long as you realise that you are only learning about stuff and not really learning the stuff there is nothing wrong with it. However, the distinction is not clear to many laymen, which results in a large number of personal theories. That is where it goes wrong.
     
  14. Jul 14, 2015 #13
    Yes that says it well. See I'm reading a book on cosmology (tegmark' s mathematical universe) and I've learned about things in cosmology and questions being asked, but I couldnt tell you why the theories make sense. I've read Liddle's Introduction to cosmology and for the most part I understood what he was saying but had no idea how he got certain Friedmann equations or why he used them when he did.
     
  15. Jul 15, 2015 #14

    vanhees71

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    2016 Award

    The problem is that you never know, whether the popular book is correct. There are a few very good popular-science books, among them Weinberg's The first three minutes on cosmlogy or Ledermann's The God Particle (despite the nonsense title). Many popular books however, simplify the issues they discuss more than possible and they become almost erratic.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?
Draft saved Draft deleted



Similar Discussions: Modern Physics Introduction?
  1. Modern Physics (Replies: 8)

Loading...