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Molar Ratios

  1. Feb 16, 2006 #1
    Can I use molar ratios for gasses, solids, and aqueous solutions all in one equation?

    For instance: Mg(s) + 2 HCL(aq) -> MgCl2(aq) + H2(g)

    Can I say that if i had 2 moles of Mg I would have 2 moles of H2. Does this trick have anything to do with Amedeo Avogadro?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 16, 2006 #2

    mrjeffy321

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    Yes, you can do that.

    In the reaction you gave,
    Mg(s) + 2 HCL(aq) -> MgCl2(aq) + H2(g)
    You can see that there is a 1:1 ratio for every mole of Mg reacted to Hydrogen gas produced. So if two moles of Mg were to react, 2 moles of H2 would be produced.
     
  4. Feb 16, 2006 #3
    Thanks man.

    Does this have anything to do with Avogadro's hypothesis?
     
    Last edited: Feb 16, 2006
  5. Feb 16, 2006 #4

    mrjeffy321

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    The coeffients in the reaction are meant to show the ratio of each substance being reacted/produced.
    The coeffients could mean the number of moles but they could also mean the number of individual atoms/molecules too.
     
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