Moment of Inertia: Solve Your Problem Now

In summary, a person asked for help with a problem involving moment of inertia. Another person suggested understanding the definition first before attempting the question. The first person then shared their solution using formulas and asked for confirmation and further explanation. Another person requested for a more thorough explanation using symbols instead of numbers and mentioned Steiner's Theorem and Parallel axis Theorem.
  • #1
iNCREDiBLE
128
0
Hello!

I have a problem and I was kind of hoping that someone could help me out.
 

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  • #2
Give us some of your thoughts.
 
  • #3
whozum said:
Give us some of your thoughts.

Well I I don't know where to start and what formula to use. As far as I can tell the area is 6x3 = 18 sq ft.
 
  • #4
Okay, here are some hints: What is the DEFINITION of "moment of inertia"? What formulas do you know relating to moment of inertia?
 
  • #5
u should actually try and understnd the definition of moment inertia before attempting the question. as u know the I, moment of inertia is affected by the shape of the solid and also at what point it is being referred to, so i had reckon u to understand the definition b4 attempting it.
 
  • #6
The understanding tends to come afterwards (for me). The surface = one rectangel + two triangles... For the rectangle I = 4*3^3/12 = 9. The two triangles I = 2(2*3^3/12) = 9. So my answer is 18 ft^4. But is this a correct solution?
 
  • #7
Please, can somebody help me & explain it to me... :confused:
 
  • #8
Could you make a more thourough post on how you got those "answers".
And please, do not use numbers, but symbols.
That makes it easier for us to spot where you've made any mistakes.
 
  • #9
Are you familiar with Steiner's Theorem or Parallel axis Theorem?
 

Related to Moment of Inertia: Solve Your Problem Now

1. What is moment of inertia?

Moment of inertia is a physical property of an object that describes its resistance to changes in rotational motion. It is a measure of an object's distribution of mass around its axis of rotation.

2. How is moment of inertia calculated?

The moment of inertia of an object can be calculated by multiplying the mass of the object by the square of its distance from the axis of rotation. This is represented by the equation I = mr^2, where I is the moment of inertia, m is the mass, and r is the distance from the axis of rotation.

3. Why is moment of inertia important?

Moment of inertia is important because it is used to determine an object's angular acceleration and the amount of torque needed to achieve a desired rotational motion. It is also used in the design of structures and machines to ensure stability and efficient movement.

4. How does moment of inertia differ from mass?

Moment of inertia and mass are related but they are not the same. Mass is a measure of an object's resistance to changes in linear motion, while moment of inertia is a measure of its resistance to changes in rotational motion. Mass is a scalar quantity, while moment of inertia is a tensor quantity.

5. How can I solve problems involving moment of inertia?

To solve problems involving moment of inertia, you will need to know the mass and dimensions of an object, as well as its axis of rotation. You can then use the appropriate equations and principles of rotational motion to calculate the moment of inertia and solve the problem. Practice and familiarity with these concepts will also help in solving problems involving moment of inertia.

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