Momentum Physics HW Questions

In summary, the conversation is discussing various scenarios involving collisions and the resulting final velocities and directions of the objects involved. These scenarios include a collision between two balls, a cannonball being shot from a cannon, two football players colliding, two vehicles colliding, and a woman being hit by a ball. The focus is on understanding concepts such as momentum and conservation of energy in these situations.
  • #1
physicsisfunn
1
0
i don't know how to solve these

1. Ball A, with a mass of 0.20-kg, strikes ball B, with a mass of 0.30-kg. The initial velocity of ball A is 0.95 m/s. Ball B is initially at rest. What are the final speed and direction of ball A and B after the collision if they stick together?

2. A 1200-kg cannon is placed at rest on an ice rink. A 95-kg cannonball is shot from the cannon. If the cannon recoils with a speed of 6.80 m/s, what is teh speed of the cannon ball?

3. An 82-kg reciever, moving 0.75 m/s south, is tackled by a 110-kg defensive linemen moving 0.15 m/s east. The football players hit the ground together. Calculate their final velocity (magnitude and direction).

4. A 95-kg car traveling south at 29 m/s hits a truck traveling 18 m/s west. After the collision the vehicles stick together and travel with a final momentum of 4.0 x 104 kg*m/s at an angle of 45 degrees. What is the mass of the truck?

5. A 77-kg woman is walking 0.10 m/s east in the gym. A man throws a 15-kg ball south and accidentally hits the woman. The woman and the ball move together with a velocity of 0.085 m/s. Calculate the direction the woman and the ball move.
 
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  • #2
1. This is an ineslatic collision. What can you tell me about inelastic collisions? Is momentum conserved? Is kinetic energy conserved?

2. Simple conservation of momentum problem, make an attempt.

3. See #1.

4. See #1.

5. See #1.

Please atleast make an attempt so then we can help you through your sticking points.
 
  • #3


I would first recommend reviewing the fundamental principles of momentum, such as conservation of momentum and the equation p=mv. Once those concepts are understood, solving these problems becomes a matter of applying those principles and using basic algebraic equations. It may also be helpful to draw diagrams or use vector representations to visualize the situations described in the questions. If further assistance is needed, consulting a textbook or asking a teacher or peer for clarification can also be beneficial.
 

What is momentum?

Momentum is a measure of an object's motion, and is calculated by multiplying its mass by its velocity.

What is the equation for calculating momentum?

The equation for momentum is p = m * v, where p is momentum, m is mass, and v is velocity.

What is the unit for momentum?

The unit for momentum is kilogram-meters per second (kg*m/s).

How does momentum relate to an object's mass and velocity?

Momentum directly relates to an object's mass and velocity, meaning that as the mass or velocity of an object increases, so does its momentum.

Can momentum be conserved?

Yes, according to the law of conservation of momentum, the total momentum of a closed system remains constant, meaning that momentum can be conserved in a system if there are no external forces acting on it.

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