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News Moore, Oklahoma tornado

  1. May 20, 2013 #1

    Astronuc

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    Massive tornado rips through Moore, Oklahoma; 51 killed, more feared dead
    http://news.yahoo.com/blogs/lookout/tornado-oklahoma-city-moore-205548879.html

    Apparently debris from Moore was carried to Tulsa.

    The tornado was preliminarily classified as EF4 (200 mph winds).
     
  2. jcsd
  3. May 20, 2013 #2
    I saw photos of the Elementary schools and they were flattened. In a place like OK why don't schools have tornado strength shelters?
     
  4. May 20, 2013 #3

    Evo

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    Just horrible, so sudden, so erratic, here they'll be focusing on one tornado, when out of the blue another forms in seconds miles away and that's the one that kills. That they don't have mandatory shelters here where tornadoes are common is mind boggling. An underground tornado shelter could save so many lives.
     
  5. May 20, 2013 #4

    lisab

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    This is awful. The pictures are horrible, I'm surprised and sad the school has so many casualties :frown:
     
  6. May 20, 2013 #5

    jtbell

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    Last edited: May 20, 2013
  7. May 21, 2013 #6

    Astronuc

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    http://www.nytimes.com/2013/05/21/us/tornado-oklahoma.html
     
  8. May 21, 2013 #7

    BobG

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    Depends on what you're protecting them from: a tornado in the area or from a direct strike.

    Tornadoes cover a lot less area than hurricanes. Flying debris from a tornado in the area is a lot bigger hazard than actually being struck by a tornado.

    The probability of being hit directly by a tornado is about once every 1400 years. Only about 1% of tornadoes reach EF4 or worse. So taking shelter in school hallways is pretty good protection against the most likely threat.

    Tornado related deaths at schools. Interestingly, the Southeast is more likely to have school fatalities even though tornado alley (Oklahoma, Kansas) has the most tornadoes.
     
    Last edited: May 21, 2013
  9. May 21, 2013 #8

    nsaspook

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  10. May 21, 2013 #9

    dlgoff

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    But ironically,

    http://www.cnn.com/2013/05/20/us/oklahoma-tornado-developments/index.html


    :cry::cry::cry::cry:
     
  11. May 21, 2013 #10

    turbo

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    So sad on so many levels. I couldn't watch the news last night, but this morning I caught some of Good Morning America. The devastation in Moore is so nasty and widespread that I would not be surprised to see the death toll double as rescuers search the rubble. If I lived nearby, I would take Duke to help search. He has a nose like a bloodhound.
     
  12. May 21, 2013 #11

    berkeman

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    For part of my mass casualty incident (MCI) training in EMT school, we watched a video of the emergency respose right after a very similar tornado in the same area a number of years ago. Very intense trying to help so many badly injured folks all at once, while running low on supplies and medical personnel. Sad to see it happen again.


    EDIT -- It was in 1999, in Oklahoma City... http://www.cnn.com/2013/05/20/us/oklahoma-1999-tornado/index.html?hpt=hp_t2

    .
     
    Last edited: May 21, 2013
  13. May 21, 2013 #12

    BobG

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    Thanks to advances in technology, average warning times are all the way up to 16 minutes. (Moore received an incredible 36 minutes of warning, but warning times that long are the exception.)

    Only a small portion of a strong F4 storm actually has F4 winds. For example, yesterday's storm was estimated between a mile wide and two miles wide, but the F4 (or above) winds only covered about a quarter mile swath.

    One needs to do a serious risk assessment between the probability of being hit by the strongest part of the storm vs the probability of being caught in your vehicle. Your vehicle will leave you vulnerable to even the weaker parts of the storm. You better be sure you can get well away from the storm's path - that you don't get caught because the storm changed direction, that downed power lines and trees aren't blocking your escape route, that you don't get caught in traffic.

    The chances of getting caught in traffic are pretty low since most people will choose to shelter in place. If you're absolutely sure you're far in front of the storm, evacuating isn't a horrible idea (just keeping in mind that the average warning time is 16 minutes - YMMV).
     
  14. May 23, 2013 #13

    jtbell

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  15. May 23, 2013 #14

    nsaspook

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  16. May 30, 2013 #15
    Watching Fox news at the moment, watching the storm clouds over a place in Oklahoma. No tunnel formed yet.

    "Officials: People should seek shelter, abandon mobile homes, avoid windows."
     
  17. May 31, 2013 #16
  18. Jun 1, 2013 #17
    Here is an interesting view from a tracking car that got caught.
    http://www.weather.com/video/tornado-hits-twc-crew-37092 [Broken]

    What I find strange is that it appears they are driving straight into the tornado. From looking at it, I would be driving quickly the other direction.
     
    Last edited: May 6, 2017
  19. Jun 1, 2013 #18

    nsaspook

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    Wow! That's a major cockpit error. They just kept driving right into the thing like a moth attracted to fire.

    These guys also had a close call but had the brains to backup.
    http://kfor.com/2013/05/31/emily-su...fy-have-very-close-call-with-el-reno-tornado/
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 6, 2017
  20. Jun 1, 2013 #19

    Evo

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    Why were all of those cars driving into the tornado? Were they all crazy tornado chasers?
     
  21. Jun 1, 2013 #20

    Office_Shredder

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    I can conjure up at least one scenario where they did the right thing... imagine the tornado is heading towards the road at a sharp angle (the angle between the road and the tornado's path is small, say 10 degrees). If you're on the road your best move is probably to drive towards the tornado and pass it before it actually intersects the road. I don't know if the tornado was taking that specific path in this case though
     
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