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More Americans accept theory of creationism than evolution

  1. Jun 13, 2007 #1

    EL

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    This is scary:
    http://www.galluppoll.com/content/default.aspx?ci=27847

    What do you think, is this mainly an educational problem?
    Is it a world wide trend, or just a local flaw in US?
    (It would be nice to compare with results for other countries, but I havn't found any good such polls.)
     
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  3. Jun 13, 2007 #2

    Office_Shredder

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    Because America is on average more religious than, say, Europe.
     
  4. Jun 13, 2007 #3

    J77

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    Possible reason... ???

    Communities in the US are more isolated than those in, say, Europe, making it easier for people to form a single believe and for that to take over the whole community; ie. without an outsider coming in and offering an alternative view.

    Is it easier for the church in the US to push their believes on these isolated communities?

    Here, I say isolated due to the large distances between individual towns, distance from my forward-thinking, large cities.

    Same goes for how Bush got in :shrugs:
     
  5. Jun 13, 2007 #4

    wolram

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    I have seen the argument against evolution (else where) the pro evolutionists
    may present pages of evidence, the anti evolutionists answer with one line
    that has no scientific content.
    It seems these people just want to have their own way no matter what.
     
  6. Jun 13, 2007 #5

    Office_Shredder

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    THis is unlikely... it's a region-wide phenomenon, not a town-specific one. Otherwise you'd see different ideas cropping up all over the place.

    In fact, it's more the opposite. If you grow up in Kentucky, everyone goes to church, everyone knows god created the earth in six days, so it's a fact. If somebody right now presented compellingscientific evidence that the earth was flat and the sun rotated around it, you'd probably blow them off, or at the least be incredibly skeptical
     
  7. Jun 13, 2007 #6

    Kurdt

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    Here is a nice chart of a survey presented by national geographic comparing the acceptance of evolution theory in different countries. The chart is a little less in depth tha the gallup poll but its gives an illustration of the broad trends between countries.

    http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/bigphotos/21329204.html
     
    Last edited: Jun 13, 2007
  8. Jun 13, 2007 #7

    JasonRox

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    They like to walk backwards in the US.
     
  9. Jun 13, 2007 #8

    JasonRox

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    It's kind of sad too because it feels like the US is going around trying to get countries to follow their views.
     
  10. Jun 13, 2007 #9

    Garth

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    Indeed. Creationism was a very minor phenomenon in Britain about forty years ago, even amongst the Evangelical churches, but now it is becoming more and more widespread, even amongst Christian university students, because of the influence of the American fundamentalist churches.

    There is a difference between the concept of 'creation' that lies at the heart of at least the three major monotheistic religions, Judaism, Christianity and Islam, and Creationism as now known in the USA and elsewhere.

    The concept of creation can sit together with scientific theory, it simply adds the interpretation of faith that says "God did it" to the story of cosmology and evolutionary biology.

    Creationism, on the other hand, chooses to interpret literally the opening chapters of Genesis (even when they are mutually contradictory when taken literally) as a 'six-day wonder' and then chooses not to interpret literally the verses that say the Earth is fixed and cannot be moved (Psalm 93:1, Psalm 104:5) and those that assume the world is flat (Psalm 19). The people of that time were living in the Late Bronze Age over three thousand years ago, their cosmology reflects that fact, it could not do otherwise.


    Garth
     
    Last edited: Jun 13, 2007
  11. Jun 13, 2007 #10

    IMP

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    What is scary is that people think they know what the truth is, they are right and everyone else is wrong. I think that many people believe in some kind of higher intelligence, not that that implies a belief in the Bible. Trying to convince people that a red hot ball of lava (early Earth) just turned itself into people, on its own, it not easy, no matter how many small steps you describe it as. You claim people are "uneducated" because they have their own beliefs that do not match yours? That is the scary part...
     
  12. Jun 13, 2007 #11

    Evo

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    We're not talking about a belief in a supreme being, we're talking about taking parts of the bible literally.

    Like Adam and Eve, they had two sons, one son killed the other, so the three of them were the only humans on the planet, so you know what had to go on for them to "be fruitful and multiply", however the bible fails to recognize that part. :rolleyes:
     
  13. Jun 13, 2007 #12

    Kurdt

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    I think many people have such a reaction to creationism because many proponents of creationism are trying to tell everyone that its science when it isn't. Even further many scientists are disappointed at the lack of trust in science by the general public when they'd rather believe some unsupported story over a theory that links a series of observable facts.
     
  14. Jun 13, 2007 #13

    russ_watters

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    Uneducated because they don't understand the concept and the evidence that it is based on. You're right that it is not an easy thing to accept (without proper treatment in a school science class), but you imply that that somehow makes the idea inferior to the super-simplistic American view of creationism. That's just rediculous. It also implies that the average American can only comprehend ideas in single-sentence soundbytes. And some of these ideas that are shown in the poll are both spectacularly simplistic and thoughtless ("God did it") and simply, straightforwardly, utterly wrong. The fact is that many Americans are simply choosing not to apply thought to this issue, and it really is a straightforward issue. That is what is scary to me.

    Others are right that this is, for the most part, a uniquely American phenomena. It is a single, specific, and high profile issue, so it can't be taken as a benchmark of overall scientific knowledge, but what it may say is that Americans are looking for an easy answer or are impressionable and succeptible to high-pressure marketing.

    Anyway, how many times are we going to have this exact discussion?
     
    Last edited: Jun 13, 2007
  15. Jun 13, 2007 #14

    D H

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    The US has been a deeply religious nation since its onset. The Europeans chased the religious whackos out of Europe from the 16th-19th centuries. They largely came to what became the US, which is still plagued with their intolerant and nonscientific views.
     
  16. Jun 13, 2007 #15
    People have believed in "creationism" for thousands of years. It's not a big deal. It doesn't matter what people believe in, they are going to try to influence others of what they believe. It's human nature. There is nothing "scary" going on. Why would it matter any more today than it did 100yrs ago??? The sciences have not been adversely impacted. I get a kick out of people acting as if there is some sort of epidemic. LOL

    What is scary is people expecting that a government should censor what one can and cannot believe.
     
  17. Jun 13, 2007 #16
    According to the bible, Adam had another named son, Seth, and other unnamed sons and daughters. This is found in Genesis, chapter 5, verses 3 and 4. Chapter 6, verse 4 indicates that there were opportunities for propagation without incest. The problem aluded to arises in chapter 7 verse 23 and chapter 9 verse 1. According to these, the incest occurred among the descendent of Noah. According to the theory of evolution, this incest occured before humans walked.

    I know my opinions on the subject of this thread are violently rejected here. I think that rather than butt heads with the religious community over this issue, we should be content to teach the scientific method and let people believe what they want. My belief is that if we could get more people to understand the scientific method, we will have the best victory we could ever have hoped to achieve.
     
  18. Jun 13, 2007 #17
    Many religious people are taught that evolution is voodoo and evil. I forgot what I said, but in response my seemingly normal friend replied "You don't ACTUALLY believe in evolution do you????", in an angry tone.

    I believe that it's not entirely an educational problem, because no amount of education now will sway them...
     
  19. Jun 13, 2007 #18

    Ivan Seeking

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    I've been a theistic evolutionist since about the 4th grade [in a Catholic school]. We were taught both creationism and evolution without apologies or equivocation because they are not mutually exclusive. The Catholics also have a Pope Scope - an observatory run by a priest. Science was a big part of my Catholic education.

    There is a huge difference between mainstream religion and fundamentalism just as there is a huge difference between Islam and radical Islam. But it does seem that many Americans have been radicalized - hence our current President.
     
    Last edited: Jun 13, 2007
  20. Jun 13, 2007 #19
    I would go as far to say that it's not a "problem" at all. I fail to see why people think it is. The job of public schools is to provide the information. It's up to the student to apply it. Once the theory of evolution is taught, a person can believe it or not believe it. Noone gets hurt, noone dies. Nothing of any real significance happens as a result. It's a non-issue.
     
  21. Jun 13, 2007 #20

    Evo

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    The problem is that the "creationists" aren't happy to keep their beliefs to themselves and are trying to get the teaching of evolution removed from schools and books and/or teach creationism as an alternate science course, which of course is ridiculous. It is because these people are trying to remove scientific knowledge from Americans and replace it with the Bible that they are very scary.

    Like Ivan, being raised catholic, very little importance was put on the bible. I had my catechism book and my missal for mass.
     
    Last edited: Jun 13, 2007
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