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More AT&T spying allegation

  1. Feb 17, 2007 #1

    Ivan Seeking

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    http://www.pbs.org/now/shows/307/index.html

    This is just more of the same. If these guys are doing what it appears that they are doing, I want heads to roll and the conspirators jailed.

    Even attorney client privilege is not protected? I want to see that one justified in front of the Supreme Court. If true, this is nothing less than an enemy attack on the American people and the Constitution.
     
    Last edited: Feb 17, 2007
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 17, 2007 #2

    turbo

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    Josef Stalin is smiling at the successes of Bush, Cheney, and their neocon cohort.
     
  4. Feb 17, 2007 #3

    Hurkyl

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    I didn't watch the video: did it really say that? I'm glad I didn't waste my time, then.
     
  5. Feb 17, 2007 #4

    Gokul43201

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    That was "originally posted by turbo-1", not by PBS-Now. C'mon hurkyl; you can distinguish between the report and the reaction!
     
  6. Feb 17, 2007 #5
    I saw this tonight on pbs, rather sad that its come to this.
     
  7. Feb 17, 2007 #6

    Hurkyl

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    And if it's purely a reaction, then it's a rather fallacious one. I'd rather not make that assumption immediately, even though it's the most plausible hypothesis.
     
  8. Feb 17, 2007 #7
    Ivan, use PGP then even if they are doing this they wont be able to decrypt your emails.

    As they say an unencrypted email is like a post card
     
  9. Feb 17, 2007 #8
    The secret service do that over here as well, in fact they've been doing it since the technology existed, I'd be surprised if most countries don't do something similar, including monitoring phone calls for key words etc.

    The difference is "we" don't know about it. It's not a breach of our civil rights because they secret service does not have to disclose its operations, and neither do we have those civil rights anyway.:smile: Big Brother is watching you...

    Go out and buy a copy of Catcher in the Rye, then make a phone call talking about a) drugs b)terror c) Islam or all three; then send several emails with the words dirty nuke, high explosives and I hate the Kufir, preferably if you could write or speak in Arabic as well that would be neat too. Brighten up an otherwise dull civil servants day:tongue2: :biggrin:
     
    Last edited: Feb 17, 2007
  10. Feb 17, 2007 #9
    Anttech what is pgp?
     
  11. Feb 17, 2007 #10

    turbo

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    Pretty Good Privacy is an encryption program.
     
  12. Feb 17, 2007 #11
    My biggest problem with this and other multi billion dollar so called security programs is that there is no guarantee that they do anything other than enrich the companies to whom the jobs are contracted.

    The VISIT program is a good example.

    http://www.azstarnet.com/allheadlines/169664
     
    Last edited: Feb 17, 2007
  13. Feb 17, 2007 #12

    Evo

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    First, it's only AT&T Worldnet e-mail servers. AT&T doesn't have the ability to do this across the internet.

    Use PGP if you're woried.
     
  14. Feb 17, 2007 #13

    Ivan Seeking

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    I'm worried about my Constitution and my country, not my emails.
     
  15. Feb 17, 2007 #14
    Me, I'm just waiting for the installation of vidcams at every intersection, in every school classroom, and meeting halls everywhere.

    The one thing I lose sleep over is the future of the net. Once access to all but mainstream sites either costs a premium or occurs at a crawl, than our one gleaming hope for the future is dashed. I personally believe that preserving the net is our top priority.
     
  16. Feb 17, 2007 #15

    Ivan Seeking

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    I also believe that the internet, and above all, a free flowing internet, is a key component in achieving world peace. Google's cop-out in China really ****** me off.
     
    Last edited: Feb 17, 2007
  17. Feb 17, 2007 #16
    Agreed so how to keep it free from political and economic forces is the issue. In a worst case scenario where wire based access, becomes restricted, I suppose we could all install dishes, but its the same problem all over again: 97% of the pop has access to an extension of corporate media, and see no reason to expand their options. The remainder talk to ourselves. I'd like to see this become a major campaign issue for 2008. Have no idea how.
     
  18. Feb 17, 2007 #17

    Evo

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    The internet is a large group of "for profit" telecom carriers that all interconnect to allow what appears to be a worlwide "internet".

    Truth is, if one or more of these global carriers were to decide to drop out, the internet would collapse. This isn't a government subsidized computer network. This is private industry allowing this.

    Now they adhere to some guidelines, but they can just decide to pull out at any time. Thousands of smaller ISP's have dropped out at one time or another stranding their customers without internet access.
    I'm personally against Verizon and AT&T's greedy push to try to get end users to double pay for certain types of internet access.

    Will they cut off home users and just deal with commercial users, maybe. Some companies like Level 3 have already made that decision, they only go after large business to business accounts.
     
  19. Feb 17, 2007 #18
    i assumed that most of the companies in the usa that make encryption software gave back-door access to national intelligence or security agencies like NSA anyway. i cant see bush allowing an american company produce encryption software that would let terrorists co-ordinate over e-mail
     
  20. Feb 17, 2007 #19
    (off topic)

    everyone gave google a hard time for not taking a moral stand for free speech, but yet there are thousands of companies that consider the bottom line before any moral implications and thats just considered the way business is done. the sale of small arms to third world countries is often a vary shady business, but who cares?
     
  21. Feb 18, 2007 #20

    turbo

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    Yes, and we should remember that "small arms" generally equates (at a minimum) to fully automatic shoulder-fired weapons with a high rate of fire. As long as they are in other countries, they are "small arms" but if they are in the US, they are really nasty, bad MACHINE GUNS (in big bold type). Our government reserves to itself (with few, highly regulated, expensive exceptions) the right to possess such weapons, while exporting mines, rocket-propelled grenades, cluster bombs, etc all over the world. Apparently, US citizens are not to be trusted, although Swiss nationals of military-service age are required to keep fully-automatic rifles and ammunition in their homes.... hmmm.
     
    Last edited: Feb 18, 2007
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