Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

More Ideal Gas Law

  1. Apr 27, 2008 #1
    A bubble, located 0.200 m beneath the surface in a glass of beer, rises to the top. The air pressure at the top is 1.01 X 10^5 Pa. Assume that the density of beer is the same as that of fresh water. If the temperature and number of moles of CO2 remain constant as the bubble rises, find the ratio of its volume at the top to that at the bottom.

    What I did was use the equation [Pressure at bottom = Pressure at top + P("rho")*g*h]. Since n and T are constant, I know: (PV)top = (PV)bottom. I need one of the volume values to solve for the other (V at top or V at bottom). Is the volume at the top 0.200m^3? Thanks.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Apr 27, 2008 #2
    You just need the ratio, not the true value for the volumes. So just solve Boyle's law for the ratio of the pressures. . .

    [tex] P_1 V_1 = P_2 V_2 [/tex]
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?
Similar Discussions: More Ideal Gas Law
  1. Ideal Gas Law Problem (Replies: 3)

  2. Ideal gas law problem (Replies: 13)

  3. Ideal gas law (Replies: 2)

  4. Ideal gas law problem (Replies: 9)

Loading...