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More Spring oscillation

  • Thread starter K3nt70
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  • #1
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[SOLVED] More Spring oscillation

Homework Statement


A 2.20 kg mass is attached to a spring and placed on a horizontal, smooth surface. A horizontal force of 17.6 N is required to hold the mass at rest when it is pulled 0.200 m from its equilibrium position (the origin of the x axis). The mass is now released from rest with an initial displacement of xi = 0.200 m, and it subsequently undergoes simple harmonic oscillations. Calculate the maximum speed of the mass.

I've calculated the following already:
Spring constant is 88.0 N/m
Oscillation frequency is 1.00 Hz



Homework Equations


This is pretty much the problem; i dont know what equation to use to get the max velocity



The Attempt at a Solution


Ive been messing around with V = -AwSin(wt) but i cant fathom how to get amplitude..
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
Hootenanny
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HINT: The amplitude is given in the question.
 
  • #3
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mkay, well the only thing i can see close to amplitude is Xi. But if thats amplitude, then all i have left to find is time..
 
  • #4
Hootenanny
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mkay, well the only thing i can see close to amplitude is Xi. But if thats amplitude, then all i have left to find is time..
xi is indeed the amplitude. However, there is no need to consider the amplitude, period, angular velocity etc. This problem can be trivially solved using conservation of energy.
 
  • #5
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Ek = 1/2 mv^2, but i dont have kenetic energy...
 
  • #6
Hootenanny
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Ek = 1/2 mv^2, but i dont have kenetic energy...
No you don't have the kinetic energy, but you can work out the initial potential energy...
 
  • #7
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Ep= 1/2 kX^2 <-- is this the equation you're referring to?
 
  • #8
Hootenanny
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Ep= 1/2 kX^2 <-- is this the equation you're referring to?
Indeed it is, and since energy is conserved you can use this to determine the velocity of the mass at any point.
 
  • #9
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woohoo! Thanks for your help!
 
  • #10
Hootenanny
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woohoo! Thanks for your help!
No problem :smile:

Don't forget to mark the thread as 'solved' when your done.
 

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