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Most impotant skill in enginering?

  1. Reading/Writing/Critical Thinking

    2 vote(s)
    10.0%
  2. Math/Science Resoning

    14 vote(s)
    70.0%
  3. Mechincal facilty/dexeteity

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  4. Creativty

    4 vote(s)
    20.0%
  1. Jan 29, 2005 #1
    What do you think is the most imporant skill an engineer will need?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 30, 2005 #2

    PerennialII

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    Went for Math/Science Reasoning, I think having a "practical head" goes far in engineering.
     
  4. Jan 30, 2005 #3

    FredGarvin

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    Which one does basic common sense fall under?
     
  5. Jan 30, 2005 #4

    Moonbear

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    I went with Math/Science Reasoning, emphasis on reasoning. I guess common sense might go with critical thinking, but since that was lumped in with reading and writing, I don't see those as the most important engineering skills (I've known good engineers who couldn't spell their way out of a paper bag, so figure writing isn't all that important). Creativity is important, but useless without the math/science reasoning. Being good with your hands doesn't make you an engineer, it makes you a mechanic. Of course, if you combine all four of those skills, you have someone quite exceptional (if you find one of them, and they happen to be male, let me know...that's my dream guy!) (Sorry tribdog, if I find someone with all four of those qualities, well, sorry.)
     
  6. Jan 30, 2005 #5

    Chronos

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    All good skills, and having them all would make you in high demand - and not just by Moonbear. In the real world, it is not enough to have great ideas and the know how to apply the science behind the engineering, you must sell the concept to management. For that reason, I subscribe to critical thinking supported by communication skills.
     
  7. Jan 31, 2005 #6

    Gokul43201

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    I too picked math/science reasoning. Actually, I know some good engineers that just have a strong intuitive feel for things (not saying they lack the ability to reason scientifically), and this can often substitute for scientific reasoning.
     
  8. Jan 31, 2005 #7

    FredGarvin

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    I went with the Math/Science reasoning, but I think that is not the best answer. I have worked with wayyyyyy too many engineers and physicists that were/are incredibly intelligent and very science savy. However, the ability to judge what is theoretically possible vs. what is actually do-able tends to elude them. Engineers have to be thinking ahead of the game, that's for sure, but the financial and time constraints imposed on them play just as an important (if not more so) role.
     
  9. Jan 31, 2005 #8

    Clausius2

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    I haven't voted anything, because all of such skills are needed:

    Reading/Writing/Critical Thinking: Of course. Probably you'll have to read a lot of manuals, user's guides and references when working at some project, and a lot of books of different topics when you're studying. Also, you have to have a critical thinking in order to discriminate which information is important and valuable for your purposes and which not.

    Math/Science Resoning: that's probably the key. Math and Science reasoning is closely united to critical and logical thinking. Doing calculations in a very short time and under pressure will be your way of life when taking exams and working at some project. The speed of the processor of your brain is a vital variable in an engineer.

    Mechincal facilty/dexeteity: Sure. Spatial imagination skills are necessary in order to understand mechanical processes.

    Creativity: Well. I assure to you that when you're studying engineer or working as an engineer, you will use your creativity several times in order to answer or solve unexpected problems.

    Maybe the key words for an engineer / engineering student are "solving unexpected problems".
     
  10. Jan 31, 2005 #9
    Clausius, for the 1000th time : you ain't no engineer, you a theoretical physicist... :rofl: :rofl: :rofl:

    How are you ? It's been a while

    regards
    marlon
     
  11. Jan 31, 2005 #10

    Clausius2

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    Hi friend,

    Just now I don't know what am I. I am now under snow due to the first semester exams. I roughly have time to go for a walk over here.

    BTW: what is a mooberrymarz?
     
  12. Jan 31, 2005 #11
    Good luck on your examinations...

    mooberrymarz is the most beautiful girl on this forum. Check out the member photo thread for here picture. She lives in South Africa but hasn"t posted here in a long time so i am starting to give up :cry:

    marlon
     
  13. Jan 31, 2005 #12

    Clausius2

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    And what is the opinion of your girlfriend about her? :rofl:
     
  14. Jan 31, 2005 #13

    errr no comment :redface:

    marlon
     
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