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Most lucrative degrees?

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  • Thread starter SootAndGrime
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  • #26
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I think he is trying to say that he gets an advantage over job interviews? Or employers will go for his Harvard degree in name
 
  • #27
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Let's see, Harvard graduates 900 students per class. There are about 500 Fortune 500 CEO's.
Wow, 900 people in one class? And in grad school?
 
  • #28
Pyrrhus
Homework Helper
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Wow, 900 people in one class? And in grad school?
An MBA is different to other Master's Degrees. One reason is the one I stated.
 
  • #29
A MA or PhD from a top-tier university is certainly one of the stepping stones to becoming the head of a big corporation. I can't name any CEO's or top-executives who don't have at least a MA from a big-name university.
 
  • #30
chiro
Science Advisor
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A college education is often required to do great things. A high school diploma strictly limits you to working at retail stores, convenience stores, gas stations, car washes, and generally jobs where your name is on your shirt. A job where your name is on your desk, or on your building for that matter, requires a thorough education. Usually a masters or professional degree from a name-brand university.

Very successful people without college degrees are extremely exceptional cases.

Off-topic, but if you work on Wall-Street, you'd better make heaps upon heaps of money in order to pay for the ridiculous cost of "new york living".

A tiny one-bedroom studio apartment in NY can cost as much as a pricey mortgage. And the closer your residence is to Manhattan, the higher the rent/mortgage.

Apartments on Manhattan island can cost millions.

Personally, I would much rather NOT live in New York, even if I was offered one of those extremely high-paying jobs on Wall-Street.
Education is not a guarantee for success. People that strive to do something and eventually achieve it, are going to get that success regardless of whether they had a high school education or a PhD.

Think about all the people who had little education and started a business that ended up becoming a successful franchise based chain of businesses.

The formal university education system deals with a small number of professions.

A great chef is someone that probably hasn't got a Harvard MBA, but they probably work their *** off and are absolutely pedantic perfectionists that make some of the best food you will ever eat.

Think about all the creative disciplines out there. Granted, a lot of actors, musicians, and so on can (and sometimes do) go to a university to study in a related field, but building up a portfolio is an ongoing thing, and this is something is more or less up to the individual. The individual is responsible for their performance standard, and in my opinion, someone with the drive in an area like music will probably have made it with a decent standard tutor and their own drive without needing to go to more formal education.

I really think you need to meet a few more people out in the world. There are plenty of people who are very financially acceptable that do really crappy jobs because everyone else doesn't want to do them because they are crappy and less "prestigious". You might even be surprised to know that a lot of these people in crappy jobs are also smart in their own way (maybe not academically, but perhaps socially, or street smart).

You should also start to think about what success really means to you. I think this is really important, because if you think success means a combination of social status, financial status, and where you got your degree, you will probably burn out and go into some kind of really bad depression or similar diagnosis with similar symptoms.

If you want to succeed in anything, you need to work hard, have a positive attitude, and treat everyone with respect. If you maintain the mentality that your staff with names on your shirts are somewhat "lesser" than yourself, you will find out the hard way what that will do to you.

You might get away with it at some institutions for a short time, but I guarantee it will come back to haunt you and you will get no respect from anyone.
 
  • #31
Pengwuino
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A MA or PhD from a top-tier university is certainly one of the stepping stones to becoming the head of a big corporation. I can't name any CEO's or top-executives who don't have at least a MA from a big-name university.
This is stupid. Did you even bother to take a quick google to look at even the top 10 Fortune 500 CEOs? It sounds like you may not even able able to name a CEO period. It took me literally 10 minutes to find every single CEO of the top 10 in the Fortune 500 list.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rex_Tillerson , BS in Civil Engineering UT Austin
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mike_Duke , BS in Industrial Tech, Georgia Tech

10 minutes and you find 2 without advanced degrees.

Although I'm guessing your next sentence will be "Certainly you need a Bachelors from at least a good school". At some point you'll say "well, you of course need at least an Associates degree from a good community college to be a CEO". Sheesh.
 
  • #32
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5
i recall having this discussion with a young man at my church who was getting a degree from our flagship state university business school. he was very shocked when i suggested his business school degree did not guarantee him a job. later that year i went into wendy's for a burger and the familiar looking guy behind the counter gave me a very nasty look. when i got outside i remembered him as the young man from the church conversation.
Wow(have a similar story-on the other end of that story)! This recently happened to me just a few weeks ago.

I was an undergraduate in biology and already had my foot in medical school. I was an Army Ranger and got activated for deployment to Bosnia. When I came back, I was basically told to be readmitted to medical school, I would have to continue to take additional course work. I choose a second undergraduate major. Upon taking physical chemistry, I decided I wanted to study physics and its application to chemical systems(it was the first thing that I was truly passionate about).

Six years later, I'm in last my last year of my Ph.D program-working one day out of the week at a restaurant, and I see some old church friends. They just starred at me with this look of dismay on what I was doing there. I explained to them what had happened the last 12 years of my life and they didn't understand the new course in my education endeavors(even thou I was happy).

I have daughter, so my ability to move for a post doc are not possible. I'm now re-considering going back to medical school.
 
  • #33
164
4
A MA or PhD from a top-tier university is certainly one of the stepping stones to becoming the head of a big corporation. I can't name any CEO's or top-executives who don't have at least a MA from a big-name university.
Here's a fun page:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_college_dropout_billionaires [Broken]

But this is pretty obvious trolling...
 
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  • #34
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A MA or PhD from a top-tier university is certainly one of the stepping stones to becoming the head of a big corporation. I can't name any CEO's or top-executives who don't have at least a MA from a big-name university.
Sources please? Have you never heard of Microsoft, Apple or Facebook? I'm pretty much oblivious to the business world, and even I know that Bill Gates, Steve Jobs, and Mark Zuckerburg don't have college degrees (except for maybe honorary ones). Please, if you're going to start a topic (or should I say, a bunch of topics) and argue a point, do everyone the courtesy of at least doing a trivial amount of research on the topic. It's really not that difficult, and I'm most certainly not the first one to tell you this.
 
  • #35
wukunlin
Gold Member
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Here's a fun page:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_college_dropout_billionaires [Broken]

But this is pretty obvious trolling...
i knew it, being a drug lord has got to be the way to go
 
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  • #36
Vanadium 50
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It's clear that the OP is not putting as much effort into making his claims as others are putting into rebutting them, which is a good time to close the thread.
 

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