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Most persistent myths.

  1. Apr 5, 2005 #1

    matthyaouw

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    Which myths, theories or conspiricies most annoy you? The kind where no matter how many times you fully debunk them, they just keep coming back again and again, and will probably never go away, despite how obvious it is that they cannat be true.

    A personal favorite of mine is:
    "The Loch Ness Monster is a descendent of a dinosaur (plesiosaur, icthiosaur, etc.) that was cut off from the sea in prehistoric times, and remained there ever since."
    No. Loch Ness is in a glacial trough and would not have been present a million years ago, and even if it were, any dinosaur would be buruied under 20 metres of till at its bed, or frozen in ice and carried out into the middle of the North Sea and dumped on its floor.
     
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  3. Apr 5, 2005 #2

    cronxeh

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    1. god exists
    2. people only use 10 percent of their brain
    3. earth is flat (oh yeah, those exist: www.flat-earth.org )
    4. string "theory"
     
  4. Apr 5, 2005 #3

    selfAdjoint

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    "Evolution is impossible because it contradicts thermodynamics."
     
  5. Apr 5, 2005 #4
    1. Glass is a liquid which flows very slowly. ( LoL http://dwb.unl.edu/Teacher/NSF/C01/C01Links/www.ualberta.ca/~bderksen/florin.html )
    2. Boiling water freezes faster than cold water. (Come on people, you have freezers! :yuck: )
    3. The universe must be bounded in order to be expanding. (sigh)
    4. Horrifying amalgamations of Newtonian principles applied to SR or QM.
    Many others that are not as prevalent in my bad memory.

    PS. Ah yes, the evolution one always crops up.
     
  6. Apr 5, 2005 #5

    cronxeh

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    glass _is_ a liquid
     
  7. Apr 5, 2005 #6

    Ivan Seeking

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    Ball lightning does not exist.

    John Crapper invented the toilet. [He was an engineer who designed the London sewer system. Bob Plopper invented the toilet. :uhh: ]

    All UFO's can be explained as trivial errors in perception, lies, etc.

    Occams Razor says that the simplest answer is always correct.

    Occams Razor is a definitive test of concept.

    Absence of [hard] evidence is evidence of absence.

    We know all that we ever will know: i.e. Any claim that can't be explained must be false.

    Observations that support the popular paradigm are true, those that do not are false.

    Religion and science are mutually exclusive.

    God does not exist.
     
  8. Apr 5, 2005 #7
    That flat earth web page is obviously a joke. The author can really be serious.

    You can easily tell from his outlandish FAQ: Like this one

    11. Does this fit in with the Hollow Earth theory?
    Yes. Beneath the Earth, or hanging off the edges, is a land populated by either green-skinned women or Nazis. All those claiming to have seen this have misinterpreted it to fit in with the spurious and false Spherical Earth theory.

    and this one

    16. Can ships be 'lost' at the edge of the Earth?
    Yes, at least in places where there are no mountains preventing this from occurring. The edge of the Earth is, in places a tremendous waterfall, and anything going over the edge will disappear into the aether. This can also happen to aircraft which fly off the edge.

    No way someone can truely believe any of that.
     
  9. Apr 5, 2005 #8
    Most persistant myths i hate are Santa, Easter bunny etc.. We will always lie to our kids about these so we can continue to brain wash them so they can grow up to be commercial whores.
     
  10. Apr 5, 2005 #9
    Ummmm. if you search the forums you will find a disscussion about his topic which leads to the conclusion that Hot water freezes faster then cold...
     
  11. Apr 5, 2005 #10
    Flat earth Society

    I am going to have to agree with Mapper
    In the section that has the dig, it says for more info go to Dave Fischer' homepage. If you read his stuff you will find that it is all just a joke. He appears to have alot of time on his hands. (Or do I since I am doing all this searching??? :confused: :confused: )

    I am not an expert or anything but I know that one of my proffesors got his PHD for doing work on the visocity of metals. AKA in the application of bridges tall buildings, ect. Why can glass not have any viscosity??? It does!!!
     
    Last edited: Apr 5, 2005
  12. Apr 5, 2005 #11
    bermuda triangle?
     
  13. Apr 5, 2005 #12
    Yeah, I was going to jump on that myself. Not necessarily "boiling" but there are certain threshholds. I didn't see the discussion here on the site but I believe it has to do with the circulation of warmer water transporting heat to the extremties and causing a loop that cools all of the water instead of an icy insulation layer forming quickly.
     
  14. Apr 5, 2005 #13
    I'll have to go with Ivan's answers but I'll also add as my annoyance:

    1) The belief that Occam's razor is not a useful and important part of the scientific method regardless of proper understanding and proper application.

    Just because it's complex doesn't mean it's right...
     
  15. Apr 5, 2005 #14
    Yet another reason viscosity is a poor judge of character. See Physics FAQ http://math.ucr.edu/home/baez/physics/General/Glass/glass.html .
     
  16. Apr 5, 2005 #15
    Not the myth I was going after. When people mention this myth in passing (at least in my experience), they believe it holds true for *any* temperature difference, which is a false statement (hence my "boiling" example). Like most recurring myths, it is an overgeneralization of a truly interesting result.
     
    Last edited: Apr 5, 2005
  17. Apr 5, 2005 #16

    Ivan Seeking

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    Could you give a specific example? I don't really see where it ever applies in practice except for where either the implication are staggeringly obvious, or perhaps in a purely mathematical sense. If we have two models that are equally successful in predicting results, however one model uses one more variable than the other, based on Occam's Razor, do we say that one is true and the other not, or do we design a test for the question at hand - which is the correct model? Aside from forming the basis for personal opinions, how is it used?
     
  18. Apr 5, 2005 #17

    chroot

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    Glass _is not_ a liquid. We're in the myths, thread, yes? Sorry to say it, but you got suckered.

    - Warren
     
  19. Apr 5, 2005 #18

    chroot

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    One of the most popular physics myths around is that the coriolis force makes your toilet water drain in one direction, while toilets on the other side of the equator drain the opposite direction.

    - Warren
     
  20. Apr 5, 2005 #19

    chroot

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    There are so many evolution myths it's not funny.

    "The eye is irreducible, and could not have developed by parts."

    "Evolution is random, and only occurs by mutation."

    "We have never actually seen evolution happen."

    - Warren
     
  21. Apr 5, 2005 #20

    Chronos

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    Well, hot water actually can be frozen faster than cold water. It is called the Mpemba effect.
     
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