1. Limited time only! Sign up for a free 30min personal tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Motion and acceleration.

  1. Sep 8, 2015 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    A skater moving on a frictionless ice at 8.0 m/s hits a 5.0-m-wide patch of rough ice. She slows steadly, the continues at 6.0 m/s. What is her acceleration on the rough Ice

    2. Relevant equations
    v2 = vo 2 + 2a (d-do)

    3. The attempt at a solution
    I have tried to set up the formula but I'm not sure how to do it properly.

    a = vo 2 + 2v2 (d-do)
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 8, 2015 #2

    andrewkirk

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper
    Gold Member

    v and v0 are the final and initial velocities.
    d and d0 are the distances from the skater's starting point to the end and beginning of the rough ice
     
  4. Sep 8, 2015 #3

    SteamKing

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    Your algebra in transposing the Equation in 2.) to the Equation in 3 is a little dodgy.

    You can't just switch the positions of a and v2 like you show. :frown:
     
  5. Sep 8, 2015 #4
    I understand that, I just have problems with setting up the formula.
     
  6. Sep 8, 2015 #5

    SteamKing

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    Well, we can't do your algebra for you. You'll have to take the Equation in Section 2 and solve for a using standard algebraic rules.
     
  7. Sep 8, 2015 #6
    Deleted
     
  8. Sep 8, 2015 #7

    SteamKing

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    Do you or do you not understand algebra?

    You've already tried switching a and v2, and we told you that wasn't correct.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?
Draft saved Draft deleted



Similar Discussions: Motion and acceleration.
  1. Accelerated Motion (Replies: 41)

Loading...