1. Not finding help here? Sign up for a free 30min tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Motion in One-Dimension

  1. Sep 9, 2007 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data

    Two objects A and B are connected by a rigid rod that has a length 35 m. The objects slide along perpendicular guide rails. If A slides to the left with a constant speed 35.2379 m/s along the x-axis, find the velocity of B along the y-axis when the rod makes an angle 27* with the x-axis. Answer in units of m/s

    2. Relevant equations

    I'm not even sure.

    3. The attempt at a solution

    I attempted to find the velocity using the equation:

    [tex]\vec{Ay}[/tex]=[tex]\vec{A}[/tex]sin[tex]\Theta[/tex]

    so,

    [tex]\vec{Ay}[/tex]=35sin(27*)

    [tex]\vec{Ay}[/tex]= 15.890 m/s

    This, however, was not correct and I really am confused about what even would be correct or how I should go about solving the problem.

    Thank you in advance for any help or information (or direction...).
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 9, 2007 #2

    bel

    User Avatar

    Since [tex] x^2+y^2=35 [/tex], then [tex]\frac{y}{x}=tan(\psi)[/tex]. Then you can differentiate both sides of that by the time t. You know the required angle, and you know [tex]\frac{dx}{dt}[/tex] as well.
     
  4. Sep 9, 2007 #3

    so,

    [tex]y=xtan\Theta[/tex]

    [tex]\frac{dy}{dt}=\frac{dx}{dt}tan27[/tex]

    [tex]\frac{dy}{dt}=35.2379*tan27[/tex] ?
     
  5. Sep 9, 2007 #4

    bel

    User Avatar

    No, you have to make use of the relation [tex]x^2+y^2=35[/tex] as well and treat [tex]\psi[/tex] as a function of time [tex]t[/tex].
     
  6. Sep 9, 2007 #5

    Astronuc

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    I think one wants - [tex] x^2+y^2=35^2 [/tex]
     
  7. Sep 9, 2007 #6

    bel

    User Avatar

    Oh right, it is the square of 35, silly me, how could I have forgotten? I apologise.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?



Similar Discussions: Motion in One-Dimension
Loading...