1. Not finding help here? Sign up for a free 30min tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Motion on inclined plane

  1. Dec 12, 2008 #1
    Assume there is no friction in the system. Can anyone write formulas for acceleration of both the small object and the triangular object? (Gravity is downwards, no other force such as air drag etc.)

    [​IMG][/URL][/IMG]
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 12, 2008 #2
    I would draw the free body diagrams for both objects first ... then remember "In the absence of friction and other forces (tension, applied, etc.), the acceleration of an object on an incline is the value of the parallel component (m*g*sine of angle) divided by the mass (m). This yields the equation : a = g sin (alpha)


    Reference: http://www.glenbrook.k12.il.us/gbssci/Phys/Class/vectors/u3l3e.html

    for the Triangular object. The applied force would be the Normal force from the smaller block ... the acceleration should come from the force paralell to the ground ..
     
  4. Dec 12, 2008 #3

    Doc Al

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    While your advice to draw free body diagrams is excellent, a = g sin (alpha) only holds if the incline is fixed. But this one can move.
     
  5. Dec 13, 2008 #4
    thanks, but I was only giving some points in the right direction. i was hoping that would have physiker99 think some .. in the future I will keep this in mind and just do the work for them ... i am new to the thread and was under the impression that the questions are not just answered with a blunt response.


    attached is a pdf ....
     

    Attached Files:

  6. Dec 13, 2008 #5

    Doc Al

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    No one is suggesting that you do the work for them, but don't you think that any comment you make should at least be correct?
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?



Similar Discussions: Motion on inclined plane
Loading...