1. Limited time only! Sign up for a free 30min personal tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Moving body on a diagonal path

  1. Sep 10, 2016 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    Log A weighs 20Kg is laid on a diagonal smooth plane with a diagonal angle of 27 37 degree, log A is tied by a rope to the head of the plane and there through a wheel with no friction the rope descend vertically to the bottom of the plane and through another friction-less wheel is tied to log B that weighs 20 Kg and is laid on a smooth horizontal plane' the last part of the rope tied to log B is horizontal

    2. Relevant equations
    1. what is the time in which log A will move a 1 meter distance on the plane if it starts from rest?
    2. what is the tension in the rope attached to both logs?

    3. The attempt at a solution
    is acceleration here 0? or maybe 6? I'm a bit lost would appreciate any help, thx!

    physics1.jpg

    [edit: fixed typo in given angle (picked up correction from post #3 -- Moderator]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 14, 2016
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 10, 2016 #2

    Doc Al

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    Well, you know the acceleration can't be zero, else the first question would not make sense.

    Do this: Analyze the forces acting on A and on B. Apply Newton's 2nd law to each.
     
  4. Sep 10, 2016 #3
    Ty!
    Is this correct? btw angle is 37 and not 27
    physics2.jpg
     
  5. Sep 10, 2016 #4

    Doc Al

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    Well, you don't show arrows. (Forces have direction.) And what does "f" represent? How do t1 and t2 relate?
     
  6. Sep 10, 2016 #5
    f - friction ohh, but they said smooth surface, so no friction
    and T1 = T2?
     
  7. Sep 10, 2016 #6

    Doc Al

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    Right.

    Right. The tension is the same throughout the rope.
     
  8. Sep 10, 2016 #7
    I'm sorry I had to go ill try and work on it some more and come back later
     
  9. Sep 10, 2016 #8

    Doc Al

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    No worries. Give it a shot and then come back and show what you've done.
     
  10. Sep 14, 2016 #9
    Thank u for your patience!
    I have this:

    1.

    m1(A)g = m2(B)g = 20Kg

    X = 1m

    mag • sinα – T = m1a

    T = m2a

    mag • sinα -T + T = m1a + m2b

    200 • 0.60 = a(m1 + m2)

    a = 120/40 = 3m/s

    X = V0T + at^2 /2

    1 = 0 + 3t^2/2

    2 = 3t^2

    t = 0.816s

    2.

    T = m2a

    T = 20 • 3 = 60N

    there are two more questions about this problem:

    3.
    If there is a friction between log B and the horizontal surface what is the minimal static coefficient of friction in which if the system is in a state of rest then it will remain in that state?

    4.
    If the kinetic and static coefficient of friction is mu = 0.25, how long will it take log A to travel a 2 meter distance on the plane (the rope is weightless)?

    how should I approach that?

    Thx again!
     
  11. Sep 14, 2016 #10

    Doc Al

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    Good!
    (1) Your first equation should be: ##m_1 = m_2 = 20## Kg
    (2) Careful with units. Acceleration has units of m/s^2.
    (3) It's almost always better to stick to symbols as long as possible before plugging in numbers. Here's how I'd do it:
    Since the masses are the same, I'd use "m" for both masses. And since the acceleration is the same, I'd use "a" for that.
    ##mg\sin\theta - T = ma##
    ##T = ma##
    Adding them, we get:
    ##mg\sin\theta = 2ma##
    And so on.

    Note that the mass cancels out! So it doesn't matter (at least for this part of the question).
    Good!

    Good!
     
  12. Sep 14, 2016 #11

    Doc Al

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    (1) What additional force acts on B? (Use symbols, not numbers.)
    (2) What is the acceleration?

    Redo your force equations with this in mind.

    This is similar to the first part, only now there is an additional force acting on B.
     
  13. Sep 14, 2016 #12
    TY!

    a = 0 ?

    mgsinα = T = f = mumg ?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 14, 2016
  14. Sep 14, 2016 #13

    Doc Al

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    Good!

    (I fixed your quotes.)
     
  15. Sep 14, 2016 #14
    Then:
    mu = sin37° = 0.6
    Ty very very much for your patience and guidance!
     
  16. Sep 14, 2016 #15

    Doc Al

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    Yep!

    You are welcome.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?
Draft saved Draft deleted



Similar Discussions: Moving body on a diagonal path
Loading...