MS ME: Full Time or Part Time?

In summary, the speaker is a recent BSME graduate with a good job who is debating graduate school. They are considering either going full time or taking one class a semester while continuing to work at the same school they received their BS from. They are unsure if academia is the right fit for them, as they enjoy learning but find homework to be tedious. They have a passion for science and engineering, but also enjoy spending their free time on other hobbies such as music and building vehicles. They have many ideas and projects they would like to pursue on their own, and are considering buying their own shop instead of working in a university lab. They question if sacrificing their passions for school is worth it, but ultimately decide to pursue a full-time MS degree
  • #1
mooktank
41
1
I'm a recent BSME grad with a good job. I'm debating graduate school. I could move away and go full time or I could take 1 class a semester and continue to work full time at the same school I got my BS from.

I'm not sure academia is for me. I thoroughly enjoy learning but homework is annoying unless it serves a purpose other than getting a grade. I learn topics without having to do them necessarily. For example, I pulled off an A- in heat transfer while doing no homework and studying roughly 2 hours for exams. Fluids was similar but I did a lot of the homework although it didn't count towards my grade. That should tell you something about my 'rebel without a cause' nature. The time I saved by slacking at school I spent on building vehicles, making movies, recording music, etc. Things that I really love as much as I love science. I even built my own wood boiler to heat my Dad's shop (I'm a TIG welder as well).

I have many ideas and projects that I'd like still to do on my own (a hydraulic hybrid off road concept vehicle, various alternative energy conversion devices, etc) and I think the best way to do this would be to continue working and buy my own shop to work on my ideas instead of working in a university lab as a slave to the funding. Besides science and engineering, I still like to spend a lot of my free time on music, video, writing, etc. I may be putting another band together soon as well.

I'm just not sure I could sacrifice all the things I love (just about everything) to focus all my energy on school. If I know what there is out there to learn, I will be interested and learn it, I just won't have a piece of paper saying I did it. Then again, that will only get you a job working for someone else and that's not ideal in my mind.

I realize it's impossible to learn and do everything but everything is interesting and nothing can stop curiousity.

Any wisdom from the elders here?
 
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  • #2
if you're willing to fund yourself and deal with the trouble of publishing results without any institution backing, i say go for the shop idea.
 
  • #3
I'm thinking more entrepreneurally rather than just trying to 'publish results'. I think I'm going to do an MS full time and see how it goes. It should be worth it and stimulating enough.
 

1. What is the difference between a full-time and a part-time MS ME program?

A full-time MS ME program typically requires students to take a full course load each semester, usually between 9-12 credit hours. This allows students to complete their degree in a shorter amount of time, usually within 1-2 years. On the other hand, a part-time MS ME program allows students to take a reduced course load, often between 3-6 credit hours per semester, and may take longer to complete the degree, usually 3-4 years.

2. Can I work while pursuing a full-time MS ME program?

It is possible to work while pursuing a full-time MS ME program, but it can be challenging. The course load and workload can be demanding, so it is important to carefully consider the time commitment before deciding to work while pursuing a full-time MS ME program. Many students opt to work part-time or intern during their studies instead.

3. Will a part-time MS ME program have the same curriculum as a full-time program?

Yes, typically the curriculum for a part-time MS ME program is the same as a full-time program. However, the pace may be different, as part-time students take fewer courses per semester. It is important to check with the specific program to ensure the curriculum meets your academic and career goals.

4. Are there any benefits to pursuing a full-time MS ME program?

One of the main benefits of a full-time MS ME program is the ability to complete the degree in a shorter amount of time. This can lead to earlier entry into the workforce and potentially higher earning potential. Additionally, full-time students may have access to more resources and opportunities, such as internships and research projects.

5. Can I switch from a full-time to a part-time MS ME program, or vice versa?

In some cases, it is possible to switch from a full-time to a part-time MS ME program, or vice versa. However, this will depend on the specific program and its policies. It is important to speak with an advisor or program coordinator to determine the feasibility of switching programs and to discuss any potential implications.

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