Multiple current loops

  • Thread starter wofsy
  • Start date
  • #1
709
0
I assume that if one has several current loops that the magnetic fields that they generate just add together linearlly. Just want to make sure.
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
1,179
5
Yup...that is how it looks to be (at least classically).
 
  • #3
Matterwave
Science Advisor
Gold Member
3,965
326
to first order they do, but I think the interaction between the current loops and other magnetic fields would induce emfs which would change the magnetic fields produced, and would further induce emfs, etc.

I suppose, if you assumed no coupling, the fields would just add linearly.
 
  • #4
709
0
to first order they do, but I think the interaction between the current loops and other magnetic fields would induce emfs which would change the magnetic fields produced, and would further induce emfs, etc.

I suppose, if you assumed no coupling, the fields would just add linearly.
Interesting. How would you solve this problem with coupling? The law of Biot and Savart would not work. I guess you would hold the currents in the loops constant.
 
Last edited:
  • #5
Matterwave
Science Advisor
Gold Member
3,965
326
For example, for 2 loops:

[tex]emf_1=\epsilon_1-\frac{d\Phi_{21}}{dt}[/tex]

[tex]emf_2=\epsilon_2-\frac{d\Phi_{12}}{dt}[/tex]

Where [tex]\Phi_{12}[/tex] that's the flux on 2 due to 1 and vice versa. It's a coupled differential equation. If you had 3 loops, you'd just have more terms and more equations. Don't quote me on this, it's been a while since I've done this stuff :P.
 

Related Threads on Multiple current loops

  • Last Post
Replies
16
Views
4K
  • Last Post
Replies
2
Views
4K
  • Last Post
Replies
20
Views
8K
  • Last Post
Replies
0
Views
2K
Replies
7
Views
12K
  • Last Post
Replies
6
Views
6K
  • Last Post
Replies
10
Views
999
Replies
9
Views
740
  • Last Post
Replies
1
Views
773
  • Last Post
Replies
2
Views
2K
Top