Multiple Intelligences

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  • #51
BiologyForums
Originally posted by Royce
This is a perfect example of Aristolean thinking vs Platonic thinking.
It is also a typical example of the ongoing discussions of objectivity vs subjectivity.

You study the cell and learn all about the cell and say you know alot about the way the brain works. You do not study the mind, youcannot studythe mind because you cann't find it in the cell. so you say the mind does not exist or is explained by the workings of a cell. Does anybody here recognize this type of thinking in relationship to the existence of subjectivity or God.

I do not in any way mean to be insulting or belittling. The work you and others are doing is great and adds greatly to our knowlege and understanding. We are greatful. Having said that I realize that your view is limit and must be to that which can be measured. This is the very definition of objective science. There is however more to the world and reality than objective science and the mind is one of them as well as the soul. You discount psychology for studying the very thing you cannot study or find.
When you find the mind the soul and human behavior in a neuron give me a call. Until then keep up the good work and thanks for the information.

We cannot know a mouse by studying mouse cells. We can know a lot about mouse cells and the physiology of a mouse but in the end we have a dead disected mouse body that we throw away. Where did that mouse, the essence of mousehood and the life of the mouse go? Where and when did we so carlessly throw those things away in our zeal to study the mouse cell so that we may know about mice. I am and will forever remain a staunch Platoist and anti-Aristotlean, the advances of Science be damned. Until we learn to study and see the forest and the trees at the same time without destroying one or the other we are still nothing but children playing with matches.
Hi Rocye. I should clarify I don't "study the cell". I'm not a cellular biologist by any means - in fact I wouldn't be able to tell you a whole lot about the cell, the knowledge has been replaced with speciality!

I study the brain from the level of neural functioning (yes it's a cell) all the way to full on behaviors such as feelings and solving methods.

The mind is not found in the cell you are right. The mind is the inverse of the totality of ones behavior and of the human experience. I did not mean the mind does not exist in a non-physical sense. I meant that what we refer to as the mind is a product of being unable to breach the physical neural system with this billions-of-years-complex experience as a human.

But the focus should be that this gap exists, it's not a misconnected attempt! And it's more understood all the time. I don't have a problem with people refering to the mind, because the task of being physical would take more text sometimes than could fit on a hosting service! But It is important for one to recognize that the mind is referenced because of an ease of communication, and not because it's a magical mystery.

Seeing the forest and the trees is only a matter of time. I'm not discounting psychology for approaching one over the other. In 2003 it makes no sense to address a condition of the mind (depression, post-trauamtic stress etc..) from a physical level completely. The goal is to treat the individual and not waste time connecting the two.

But it's merely important to know they can be connected. Identifying where something is, and identifying what something is are different. "The mind" and all "behaviors" are known in location without a doubt. For one to suggest some sort of soul as a non-physical thing is absurd because nothing relies on it, and nothing supports it.

That is why we have pscyhology. It comes from a need for a means, but without this massive level of understanding. It's a functional science which serves the public, but it's clear that physical neurology is creating specifics where psychology is general.
 
  • #52
hypnagogue
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Originally posted by BiologyForums
You're misunderstanding that all human ability and cause comes from a communication of neural tissues.

The neurological understanding of intelligence is values of these communications and therefore encompasses all these observed forms of "intelligence".

social, emotional, strict, musical, etc... all these are merely human input, storage, manipulation, and output and they all occur with the same type of cells.

The understanding of the physical intellect encompasses all these. And understands them much better.
You seem here to have relapsed again to the idea that 'intelligence' is simply the neural activity of the brain. However, consider for example that language is processed in one area of the brain, and visual-spatial abilities in another. Now these are both forms of intelligence. You seem to be claiming that the same 'intelligence' drives linguistic computation and spatial computation. What I see here is a misuse of wording. The same physical principles certainly drive both processes-- namely, the neurobiological computational principles of the human brain; neurons exciting and inhibiting eachother, and so on. But clearly there are different algorithms involved in linguistic intelligence and visual-spatial intelligence; these algorithms are embodied in the specific connections between neurons and their tendencies to excite and inhibit eachother. The term "intelligence" is characterized much better in terms of these specific information processing algorithms than the general physical principle of neurobiological computation. Thus, since the algorithms are distinct, I believe it is incorrect to say the intelligent processes involved (linguistic intelligence and visual-spatial intelligence) are not distinct.
 
  • #53
BiologyForums


Originally posted by hypnagogue
You seem here to have relapsed again to the idea that 'intelligence' is simply the neural activity of the brain. However, consider for example that language is processed in one area of the brain, and visual-spatial abilities in another. Now these are both forms of intelligence. You seem to be claiming that the same 'intelligence' drives linguistic computation and spatial computation. What I see here is a misuse of wording. The same physical principles certainly drive both processes-- namely, the neurobiological computational principles of the human brain; neurons exciting and inhibiting eachother, and so on. But clearly there are different algorithms involved in linguistic intelligence and visual-spatial intelligence; these algorithms are embodied in the specific connections between neurons and their tendencies to excite and inhibit eachother. The term "intelligence" is characterized much better in terms of these specific information processing algorithms than the general physical principle of neurobiological computation. Thus, since the algorithms are distinct, I believe it is incorrect to say the intelligent processes involved (linguistic intelligence and visual-spatial intelligence) are not distinct.

The algorithms are different. This does not stop them from both and all being intelligence. Intelligence is not an algorithm, it's the processes of algorithms - all of them combined make intelligence. Like all evolutionary agents make evolution. Agents = algorithms, evolution = intelligence.

I am not relapsing to any idea. I am in the field of BNN and am well aware of the definition of intelligence, no less than any person in the field since there are so very few.

Intelligence is intelligence. Algorithms for neural processes can number in the billions, they are all intelligence.
 
  • #54
hypnagogue
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Originally posted by BiologyForums
The algorithms are different. This does not stop them from both and all being intelligence. Intelligence is not an algorithm, it's the processes of algorithms - all of them combined make intelligence. Like all evolutionary agents make evolution. Agents = algorithms, evolution = intelligence.

I am not relapsing to any idea. I am in the field of BNN and am well aware of the definition of intelligence, no less than any person in the field since there are so very few.

Intelligence is intelligence. Algorithms for neural processes can number in the billions, they are all intelligence.
So you are saying that the totality of all intelligent processes is what we call 'intelligence.' But I see no reason why we can only speak of intelligence in such a general way and cannot distinguish between types of intelligence. For instance, it is easy to conceive of person A, who is very linguistically intelligent but not very spatially intelligent, and person B, who is very spatially intelligent but not very linguistically intelligent. Clearly there is a categorical distinction to be made between their respective capacities for intelligence, so why is it by definition invalid to speak of linguistic intelligence as opposed to spatial intelligence? Because you have decided to define intelligence as such and because your opinion is obviously priveleged because you identify yourself with a restricted scientific community and its paradigms?
 
  • #55
BiologyForums


Originally posted by hypnagogue
So you are saying that the totality of all intelligent processes is what we call 'intelligence.' But I see no reason why we can only speak of intelligence in such a general way and cannot distinguish between types of intelligence. For instance, it is easy to conceive of person A, who is very linguistically intelligent but not very spatially intelligent, and person B, who is very spatially intelligent but not very linguistically intelligent. Clearly there is a categorical distinction to be made between their respective capacities for intelligence, so why is it by definition invalid to speak of linguistic intelligence as opposed to spatial intelligence? Because you have decided to define intelligence as such and because your opinion is obviously priveleged because you identify yourself with a restricted scientific community and its paradigms?
This is in no way my definition of intelligence. I do not have "my own" definition of intelligence. This is how science communicates, through accepted definitions, which usuall are different from the general publics because the general public has not a single clue what they are talking about or refering to.

Speaking of types of intelligence is like speaking of types of evolution. It's not possible - Evolution does not have types. It does have evolutionary agents. And the equal, in the area of intelligence, can be considered - if you want - algorithms, solving methods.

But "types of intelligence" isn't a proper usage just like "types of evolution" isn't.

As I said before, the values which constitute a measure of intelligence are measured at any level - the level of a whole brain, the level of a brain focus, or of a sub-focus.

That is fine - you can speak on intelligence capacitance of the temporal love having a different value than the parietal lobe for example.
 
  • #56
Les Sleeth
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Originally posted by BiologyForums
I find myself disinterests in speaking with you. You seem hostile without knowledge.
Of course you feel disinterested (hmmmmm, I thought you were about to say you were going to put me on your "ignore" list) . . . I am challenging you to properly participate in a debate, and to be honest. Think about your statement “You seem hostile without knowledge.” How did you come to that conclusion? There is only one way, and that is you already assume you are correct and so anyone who disagrees must lack knowledge. Well, my previous statements are still posted for everyone to see, so why don’t you go back and pick out those statements of mine which exhibit lack of knowledge?

You, however don’t hesitate to claim you know something that no one else knows. For example:

Originally posted by BiologyForums
"The Mind" (which means the totality of the brain functions) is a term used because it takes an enormous wealth of understanding to explain a simple behavior on the level of neural networking. There is mounds of knowledge on the mind and the gap between mental processes, human behavior, and neural activity.
So the mind is the “totality of the brain functions”? Prove it. You are here stating as fact that which is still a raging debate. Don’t you think you should have said, “some of us believe. . .” and thereby acknowledge the issue is still unproven?

But undaunted you go on to say:

Originally posted by BiologyForums
Everyone else here has asked questions and had some excellent points. You're just attacking and claiming you know what is known about "the mind" when you cannot answer the above questions
Well, maybe the others have more patience because they haven’t seen this as much as I have. You seem to think you are unique, but here, and at the old PF, I have seen this approach of yours so (too) many times. People come here thinking they are the geniuses of the world, and the rest of us should be on our knees awaiting any tiny tidbit of wisdom they may wish to toss our way. Like this gem, “If anyone wants to some good book recommendations I can suggest a few I reference daily.” Of course! That’s the reason your eminence has been confronted -- we ignorant little nitwits are too stupid to study a prevalent and important subject like neuroscience.

Proof you believe that is demonstrated in the following:

Originally posted by BiologyForums
Let me ask you, you who seems to know exactly what is known and not known about the mind:

1. What is the average length of a neuron in the Pons?
2. If a sodium channel opens and 25mV and is 1mm from the hillock will the hillock reach threshold?
3. Name one brain location where axons are not myelinated?
4. In a patient with epilepsy, before split-brain surgery, which isde of their brain customarily begins a seizure?
5. What are the two major ways the blood-brain barrier are sealed?
6. What is the function which properly describes the uptake of norepenephrin of the central nerves of the pre-frontal lobe?

You won't find the answers to ANY of these questions on the internet (without database searching) and you won't find the answers to any of these in the average bookstore.
Truly, unbelievably, incredibly arrogant – maybe a new height for this site (and I have seem some real champs). Okay, I will take your little test if you first take mine to prove to me you are worthy of even being listened to.

Naaa . . . I wouldn’t ask that of anyone, it is just too embarrassingly egocentric. But, you obviously don’t seem to think so because you continue:

Originally posted by BiologyForums
The signals two thinks: One is you are attacking an issue you are totally unaware of. And two is that like I stated earlier, the public and most of the scientific community are unaware of the information gathered in brain science.
Why, how utterly scientific. How do you know what I am aware of and what I am not? I will pit my education against your narrow perspective any day of the week. From what I can see, you’ve studied what supports your position, and that’s it. Ever wonder about what you might have overlooked?

Look, I have nothing against the materialist position. It may be the correct one. But a debate is supposed to be about trading reason and evidence. It’s not the “issue” that I am attacking, it is your dubious debating techniques . . . they are arrogant, condescending and deceitful.

Here’s the objective truth: empirical materialism has explained only the physical processes associated with life and consciousness. They have NOT demonstrated that that “association” is actually causing life and consciousness. That’s why it is so easy to spot a scientism zealot, because every single time they talk about theory like it’s an established fact; they accuse others of ignorance of this “truth”; and they offer their enlightened guidance to help point the Way out of our delusions and into the radiance of their materialist deity.

Frankly, I don’t see a damn bit of difference between a scientism fanatic or a religious one. Both want to jump ahead (and way ahead) of what evidence supports.
 
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  • #57
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Originally posted by BiologyForums
Yes. There is a very good reason psychologists are not allowed to prescriptions. It's because a medication is a physical material, and a psychologist is not trained in the physicalities of the body.

They do recieve a small amount of education in the physical aspects, but it's more limited than a second year bachelors degree in biology.

For instance I know 5 psychologists I speak with regularly who are professors on and off. They know the 3 main parts of a neuron, but they don't even know what types of channels a neuron can have. This information is so elementary it's on a one page "study guide" sheet in anatomy you can buy in university bookstores.

The field of psychology works by merely observing the human action and reaction. They are not trained in knowing what is occuring within the brain. And they will admit this. It's not a bad thing - it's a different thing.
I've been reading a bit on the psychologist/psychotherapist vs psychiatrist debate, and it would seem that both are valuable, but some feel that psychiatry is being threatened by counseling psychotherapists who are pushing for the ability to prescribe meds, which I feel is a mistake, as they do not have the in-depth training and knowledge, as you said, of the human mind. So for me that puts clinical/counseling psychology out of the running. I've also heard mentioned as a recurring theme that psychiatry is looked down upon by the other professions due to it's lesser requirements, and thusly it pays the least. True/false?

Regarding neurologists and psychiatrists.

Absolutely. A psychiatrist examines DSM conditions based on physical abnormalities in neurotransmitters, and a few other examinations but mostly this. They then give medications to correct this biologically.

A neurologist is a master of the entire nervous system. Not just the behavioral (subjective) focuses of psychiatry and psychology.

A neurologist must deal with the whole of the nervous system and it's connections with other systems. A neurologist sees patience with nervous disorders such as parkinsons, brain cancer, neck cancer (if near brain stem), spinal disorders causing problems in the nerve cords.

Understand that it's not a matter of more or less necessarily. A psychologist is trained to merely observe a humans behavior and the concept a human has of their own behavior.

A psychiatrist is trained to oberve the same behaviors and a few more, and to understand how medicine can adjust this problem.

A neurologist is trained to understand any possible malfunctions of the entire nervous system. A neurologist would not see a patient who had depression, he would see a child who was born with brain cancer.

And remember, a neurologist can perform surgery.

If you want to know more about the differences in career and lives of neurologists and psychiatrist ask - I can provide quite a bit of information mostly because medicine is in the family, and a correspond with a few of each fields monthly. [/B]
Regarding Neurology, I've heard that neurology is an underpaid profession- which is not a preferred thing when you have to rack up 150-200k in debt to do it. I'm not doing this for the money, all things being equal I'd choose the one of these 3 that I wouldn't be paying off the rest of my life. I've also heard that neurology is not in high demand due to psychiatrists, but I may be off.

Then there are the other sub-specialties such as neuropsychology, neuropsychiatry,forensic psychiatry, etc. Hard to know what's what except for the fact that one set requires a medical degree and the other does not. I do know I'm going for that, so that narrows the field down a bit.


Ok let's sum all that up with 1, two pronged question. Of the 3, if you had to choose one profession, which would it be, and why?

(I realize it's a loaded question as you're already in the field, but maybe you can give me some insight)
 
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  • #58
BiologyForums
Originally posted by Zantra
I've been reading a bit on the psychologist/psychotherapist vs psychiatrist debate, and it would seem that both are valuable, but some feel that psychiatry is being threatened by counseling psychotherapists who are pushing for the ability to prescribe meds, which I feel is a mistake, as they do not have the in-depth training and knowledge, as you said, of the human mind. So for me that puts clinical/counseling psychology out of the running. I've also heard mentioned as a recurring theme that psychiatry is looked down upon by the other professions due to it's lesser requirements, and thusly it pays the least. True/false?
They can push all they want - no one who does not complete medical school will likely ever get the ability to prescribe medicine.

Both are valuable merely because psychologist and the other variety of "therapists" are cheaper, and so people without money can attempt to get something that might help them. Medication is cheaper than therapy, but it takes fees from a physician to get a prescription.

I have never ever heard of or experienced anyone "looking down" on psychiatrists. It is absolutely one of the most upheld medical positions, and psychiatrists often work hand in hand with neurologists for research, training, and helping the individual.

In fact I've never heard of any medical field being insulted over any other, physicians have a bond no matter of it's a foot doctor to a brain doctor - they're united.

Psychiatry doesn't have any lesser requirements than any other medical field. SOme programs are 5 years some may go to 8 but it's the training needed to master the field.


Originally posted by Zantra

Regarding Neurology, I've heard that neurology is an underpaid profession- which is not a preferred thing when you have to rack up 150-200k in debt to do it. I'm not doing this for the money, all things being equal I'd choose the one of these 3 that I wouldn't be paying off the rest of my life. I've also heard that neurology is not in high demand due to psychiatrists, but I may be off.
Neurology has one of the longest medical training programs, if not the longest. It can vary from school to school but still it remains intense.

I'm not particularly familiar with an issue of being underpaid. Although of course there are issues with ALL medical positions being underpaid in comparison to fees met and to malpractice claims.

What are the stats you've gotten on entry level and ten year career incomes for a neurologist? It really is a function of area as well, as is with all medical positions.

Remember neurology focuses on MANY issues psychiatry does not. Psychiatry is just as psychology, a focus on the person and the personality.

Neurologists and psychiatrists are barely in competition if at all. Neurologists deal with so many diseases, malfunctions, and complications requiring surgery that (a) exist outside the brain and (b) do not affect the personality

They're two very different fields alltogether.

Originally posted by Zantra

Then there are the other sub-specialties such as neuropsychology, neuropsychiatry,forensic psychiatry, etc. Hard to know what's what except for the fact that one set requires a medical degree and the other does not. I do know I'm going for that, so that narrows the field down a bit.
Ok let's sum all that up with 1, two pronged question. Of the 3, if you had to choose one profession, which would it be, and why?

(I realize it's a loaded question as you're already in the field, but maybe you can give me some insight)
I have a love for the nervous system. I do not care for much else about the science of life - but the nervous system gets me.

If I was to choose to have the knowledge and degree to practice under any of these areas I would choose to be a neurologist - and specifically a neurosurgeon.

I do not, and probably will never, treat patients in my career. I pursue science through research for the sake of knowledge and do not "cure" humans.

But I would love to perform this most delicate, difficult, and challenging task of brain surgery and spine surgery!
 
  • #59
BiologyForums
Sleeth - Please respond with answers to my previous questions. You make claims that would require you to have the knowledge of a graduate or medical degree, and yet they go against the fundamentals of such degrees.

This makes it more likely you do not have these degrees than that you do, because it's rare one with such a degree to have been taught this knowledge would go against it.

So please show me that you can understand the questions above, and this will allow me to explain the problems with your assumptions in medical equations and processes.

Until then, I don't want to take the time to type the medical information from which these fundamentals are shown.

Awaiting....


1. What is the average length of a neuron in the Pons?
2. If a sodium channel opens and 25mV and is 1mm from the hillock will the hillock reach threshold?
3. Name one brain location where axons are not myelinated?
4. In a patient with epilepsy, before split-brain surgery, which isde of their brain customarily begins a seizure?
5. What are the two major ways the blood-brain barrier are sealed?
6. What is the function which properly describes the uptake of norepenephrin of the central nerves of the pre-frontal lobe?
 
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  • #60
Les Sleeth
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Originally posted by BiologyForums
Sleeth - Please respond with answers to my previous questions. You make claims that would require you to have the knowledge of a graduate or medical degree, and yet they go against the fundamentals of such degrees.

This makes it more likely you do not have these degrees than that you do, because it's rare one with such a degree to have been taught this knowledge would go against it.

So please show me that you can understand the questions above, and this will allow me to explain the problems with your assumptions in medical equations and processes.

Until then, I don't want to take the time to type the medical information from which these fundamentals are shown.

Awaiting....


1. What is the average length of a neuron in the Pons?
2. If a sodium channel opens and 25mV and is 1mm from the hillock will the hillock reach threshold?
3. Name one brain location where axons are not myelinated?
4. In a patient with epilepsy, before split-brain surgery, which isde of their brain customarily begins a seizure?
5. What are the two major ways the blood-brain barrier are sealed?
6. What is the function which properly describes the uptake of norepenephrin of the central nerves of the pre-frontal lobe?
I suggest you are a sophist who is afraid to make your case without falling back on degrees, tests or status. If you are so smart, then why are you asking for credentials instead of showing us all your willingness to stand on your education, understanding and reasoning abilities as you explain yourself? I've always thought it cowardly to resort to authority status when the cards are down -- are you afraid to stand up and expose yourself?

How about this: let's fight it out right here, in front of everyone.

I will suggest what I believe are fair rules. Disagree with the debate rules if you want, and if you are honest, I will adjust.

My suggestion for the rules are:

Proof is that which has been demonstrated to be true, not by inference, but by direct observation and by multiple researchers.

We make our case by evidence and logic . . . no "I am the expert and so my opinion must be accepted" bullsh*t allowed . . .from either of us.

Each contestant must respond to each of the other's points, conscientiously, and especially after carefully researching what is brought up that one is unfamiliar with.

Finally, sincerity. An open heart and mind, a willingness to change one's views at every single point along the way. A commitment to knowing the truth over and above what we personally suspect is true.

If you agree to that, then I say you cannot prove material processes are solely responsible for human consciousness. I also say you have been talking here as though it has been proven. I am ready to back that claim up with your quotes. That is the debate I am interested in. I do not want to debate whether or not something other that material processes are at work in consciousness, and I should not have to because I have not asserted that is true. My objection is purely to your absolute position of certainty, and pretending (I claim) you have more evidence than you do to prove material processes can account for consciousness.

If don't want to debate that, then let's skip it.
 
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  • #61
BiologyForums
Originally posted by LW Sleeth
I say you are a sophist who is unable to make your case without falling back on degrees, tests or status. If you are so smart, then why are you asking for credentials instead of showing us all your willingness to stand on your education, understanding and reasoning abilities as you explain yourself? I've always thought only slimeball cowards resort to authority status when the cards are down because they are afraid to stand up and expose themselves.

How about this: let's fight it out right here, in front of everyone.

I will suggest what I believe are fair rules. Disagree with the debate rules if you want, and if you are honest, I will adjust.

My suggestion for the rules are:

Proof is that which has been demonstrated to be true, not by inference, but by direct observation and by multiple researchers.

We make our case by evidence and logic . . . no "I am the expert and so my opinion must be accepted" bullsh*t allowed . . .from either of us.

Each contestant must respond to each of the other's points, conscientiously, and especially after carefully researching what is brought up that one is unfamiliar with.

Finally, sincerity. An open heart and mind, a willingness to change one's views at every single point along the way. A commitment to knowing the truth over and above what we personally suspect is true.

If you agree to that, then I say you cannot prove material processes are solely responsible for human consciousness. I also say you have been talking here as though it has been proven. I am ready to back that claim up with your quotes. That is the debate I am interested in. I do not want to debate whether or not something other that material processes are at work in consciousness, and I should not have to because I have not asserted that is true. My objection is purely to your absolute position of certainty, and pretending (I claim) you have more evidence than you do to prove material processes can account for consciousness.

If don't want to debate that, then let's skip it.
Wow, this is not a very mature way to go about things. Fighting it out? I am truly grateful you are not in the scientific community, if we used this method for supplying truths we'd be a disgrace!

Of course I want to "skip it". I'm not interested in hearing a debate from someone who is not knowledgable on the subject - why would I? What could you possible have to offer to a community skilled to the highest degree in such a specific field?

The others who have posted here have ask good questions are had minor debates that held there own. There is no debate available!
 
  • #62
hypnagogue
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Originally posted by BiologyForums
Wow, this is not a very mature way to go about things. Fighting it out? I am truly grateful you are not in the scientific community, if we used this method for supplying truths we'd be a disgrace!

Of course I want to "skip it". I'm not interested in hearing a debate from someone who is not knowledgable on the subject - why would I? What could you possible have to offer to a community skilled to the highest degree in such a specific field?

The others who have posted here have ask good questions are had minor debates that held there own. There is no debate available!
Actually, Les doesn't require a degree in neurology to put forth the argument he is putting forth. I don't have to know the rest mass of an electron to question science's assumuptions about the nature of reality. Similarly, Les doesn't need to know the average length of an axon to call into question the ultimate relationship between brain and mind. This is a metaphysical question that has no bearing on the minutiae of brain processes.
 
  • #63
BiologyForums
Originally posted by hypnagogue
Actually, Les doesn't require a degree in neurology to put forth the argument he is putting forth. I don't have to know the rest mass of an electron to question science's assumuptions about the nature of reality. Similarly, Les doesn't need to know the average length of an axon to call into question the ultimate relationship between brain and mind. This is a metaphysical question that has no bearing on the minutiae of brain processes.
Regardless, I'm not going to take the time to "fight it out" with someone who is unfamiliar with even the most elementary aspects of the brain. If he wants to make a claim and/or ask a question fine but attempting some sort of shoutmatch isn't necessary - I have nothing to gain from it!
 
  • #64
Les Sleeth
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Originally posted by BiologyForums
Wow, this is not a very mature way to go about things. Fighting it out? I am truly grateful you are not in the scientific community, if we used this method for supplying truths we'd be a disgrace!

Of course I want to "skip it". I'm not interested in hearing a debate from someone who is not knowledgable on the subject - why would I? What could you possible have to offer to a community skilled to the highest degree in such a specific field?

The others who have posted here have ask good questions are had minor debates that held there own. There is no debate available!
You know, I would be totally supportive of you if you hadn't behaved so unconcerned of other's views. So, I cannot apologize for your angst over me demanding you stand up and defend statements you claim are the truth.
 
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  • #65
740
2
Neurology has one of the longest medical training programs, if not the longest. It can vary from school to school but still it remains intense.

I'm not particularly familiar with an issue of being underpaid. Although of course there are issues with ALL medical positions being underpaid in comparison to fees met and to malpractice claims.

What are the stats you've gotten on entry level and ten year career incomes for a neurologist? It really is a function of area as well, as is with all medical positions.

Remember neurology focuses on MANY issues psychiatry does not. Psychiatry is just as psychology, a focus on the person and the personality.

Neurologists and psychiatrists are barely in competition if at all. Neurologists deal with so many diseases, malfunctions, and complications requiring surgery that (a) exist outside the brain and (b) do not affect the personality

They're two very different fields alltogether.



I have a love for the nervous system. I do not care for much else about the science of life - but the nervous system gets me.

If I was to choose to have the knowledge and degree to practice under any of these areas I would choose to be a neurologist - and specifically a neurosurgeon.

I do not, and probably will never, treat patients in my career. I pursue science through research for the sake of knowledge and do not "cure" humans.

But I would love to perform this most delicate, difficult, and challenging task of brain surgery and spine surgery! [/B]
One of the sources I've found is the student doctor network:
http://forums.studentdoctor.net/

As for the salaries, the following sites have been a good source:
http://www.allied-physicians.com/sa...an-salaries.htm

http://www.physicianssearch.com/physician/salary1.html [Broken]

http://www.physicianssearch.com/physician/salary2.html [Broken]

http://www.uoworks.com/pdfs/charts/salary2000.pdf [Broken]

If I were in it for the money I'd be pursuing Anesthesiology or Radiology, but I'm not in it (solely) for the money. Neurology is middle of the road when compared to other specialization's salaries.
My reasons for choosing these fields are simple. There are still a lot of questions about the mind when contrasted with other areas of medicine, where everything is static, and once the formuala for treatment is mastered(no to minimalize that, because it's no small task) There's no room left for growth. Neurosciences are still growing and I like to be challenged.

Incidentally, I don't know if you've mentioned this elsewhere, but what area of research are you in? I'm assuming it's some field related to neuroscience, but I was just wondering.
 
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  • #66
hypnagogue
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Originally posted by BiologyForums
This is in no way my definition of intelligence. I do not have "my own" definition of intelligence. This is how science communicates, through accepted definitions, which usuall are different from the general publics because the general public has not a single clue what they are talking about or refering to.
I have more than a clue what I am talking about, and I disagree with your definition of intelligence (it is YOUR opinion of intelligence; regardless of whether you formulated it or not, you have chosen to accept it). Science is not the end-all of knowledge; it is a process of continual correction and revision. And thing we are discussing is not an objective fact; it's not like you can poke and prod your way through brain tissue and magically find intelligence. Intelligence is a subtle concept, and the way you have chosen to define it is not the final definitive word on the subject.

Speaking of types of intelligence is like speaking of types of evolution. It's not possible - Evolution does not have types. It does have evolutionary agents. And the equal, in the area of intelligence, can be considered - if you want - algorithms, solving methods.

But "types of intelligence" isn't a proper usage just like "types of evolution" isn't.

As I said before, the values which constitute a measure of intelligence are measured at any level - the level of a whole brain, the level of a brain focus, or of a sub-focus.
You have not given me sufficient reason to accept your stance that 'intelligence is like evolution,' an entity without types. Your reasoning seems to rest on your position that intelligence depends on speed and bandwidth, and that these qualities can be found throughout the brain. When I have proposed that intelligence is more than that (specifically, something which hinges on how information is processed), and thus can be expressed through specific and more or less independent applications, you have rebutted me by saying: no, by definition, intelligence is a global phenomenon of the brain. But this is the exact premise I have been trying to get you to logically support! So we have a circular argument here: you are assuming the very notion you are trying to prove. I do not accept your position that intelligence is without types, since I do not accept your position that intelligence is measured only (or even primarily) by speed and bandwidth.
 
  • #67
Les Sleeth
Gold Member
2,166
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Originally posted by Zantra
OK hopefully you'll read this as it's now an old post. Basically everything is definable and measurable. If it warrants signficance, then science has found a way to define it. I believe that there are aspects of intelligence that are just now beginning to be better defined. Things like social intelligence are known, but have not yet been put up against a measurable standard. As I allude to a few posts down, I believe that some intelligences are a result of other larger intelligence factors. If someone is gifted in linguistics, and also in processing information, that may as a by-product, make them more socially adept. However social intelligence isn't defined because it's not it's own seperate category, but what could be looked at as a subcategory, or a by-producted of a combination of other measurable intelligences. Does this mean it can't be measured? No. Does this mean it's not worthy of measurement? No. I'm not an expert, but that's how it would seem to be, to me.
Ok, define consciousness. Measure love or appreciation or joy.

There are aspects of we humans which seem only truly known when they are directly experienced/felt; and other aspects, such as computing skills, which really do lend themselves to indirect knowledge processes such as measurement and definition.

What I object to is trying to imprison the human being in a single, all-defining box. That is exactly what the "measure-only" advocates are out to achieve. What is the problem with allowing that human may have both structural and indivisible (and therefore undefinable/unmeasurable) aspects?

I will give you my little theory of why some people want to create a box. It is because they are lacking in abilities with either the structural side or the feeling/sensitivity side of the human. So they come out with philosophies and models that allow them to be strong with what they can do. They do not realize they are projecting their own underdevelopment onto reality.
 
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  • #68
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Originally posted by LW Sleeth
Ok, define consciousness. Measure love or appreciation or joy.

There are aspects of we humans which seem only truly known when they are directly experienced/felt; and other aspects, such as computing skills, which really do lend themselves to indirect knowledge processes such as measurement and definition.

What I object to is trying to imprison the human being in a single, all-defining box. That is exactly what the "measure-only" advocates are out to achieve. What is the problem with allowing that human may have both structural and indivisible (and therefore undefinable/unmeasurable) aspects?
I find myself on the opposite side of the coin. Time to play devil's advocate, as I've always supported what you're saying about some things such as love being immeasurable. If we truly wished to define something we could using the scientific method. We would simply take a sampling of people in love, then establish a range of how much they were in love, then finally break it down into a scale based on the degrees of thier love. Would I ever wish to do that? No. I'm a firm believer in the undefined aspects of human nature, and that even though it COULD be defined, from a subjective, humanistic side, it shouldn't.

Again I'm not arguing the value of religion at all. It brings meaning to many people's lives, weather it's real or not. Some people define thier very existence based around religion. I don't disparage them for that. Religion has it's place in society. But we're not talking about the value that it adds, we're talking about it's definable reality. It's all subjective as the reality of it is in the eye of the believer. Belief in religion is what makes it real, scientific data aside. But as for me, I choose not to accept something based on something that can't be psysically defined or accounted for.

I will give you my little theory of why some people want to create a box. It is because they are lacking in abilities with either the structural side or the feeling/sensitivity side of the human. So they come out with philosophies and models that allow them to be strong with what they can do. They do not realize they are projecting their own underdevelopment onto reality.
Well that's an interesting assessment, and it may be true in some cases, but I can't say I believe it's true in my case. I do not accept religion at face value. However I am spiritual in other, more humanistic ways. I believe in, and uphold the beliefs that religion preaches. I enjoy humanistic experieces as much as the next guy, and interaction with people close to me, as many others do. I many ways I'm no different than a christian, islam, or buddhist follower. It's just that my believes that I uphold come more from a human perspective and value of how I treat and interact with others.

If the message is the same, than the messanger becomes unimportant.
 
  • #69
Les Sleeth
Gold Member
2,166
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Originally posted by Zantra
I find myself on the opposite side of the coin. Time to play devil's advocate, as I've always supported what you're saying about some things such as love being immeasurable. If we truly wished to define something we could using the scientific method. We would simply take a sampling of people in love, then establish a range of how much they were in love, then finally break it down into a scale based on the degrees of thier love.
You are, of course, correct to say that one could devise a way to measure love, or at least some aspects of it such, for instance, physiological reactions to it. I should have expressed myself more accurately.

There are things which by measuring them, one gains valuable insights into their nature and also how to untilize them. Love is not one of those things. Whatever measurement you might come up with, it is not going to tell you much about the experience of love. In that case, the direct experience is really the only way to make it valuable, and only to oneself.

On the other hand, you could measure the ideal hormonal balance in humans that leads to mating. If an Eskimo tribe in some remote area of the North Pole were having trouble mating because the ozone layer was upsetting their hormonal balance, you could use that information to get them going.

So what I meant was, there are things which give us practical benefits to measure, and there are things which only give us benefit when we directly experience them.

Originally posted by Zantra
Would I ever wish to do that? No. I'm a firm believer in the undefined aspects of human nature, and that even though it COULD be defined, from a subjective, humanistic side, it shouldn't.
And see. . . you agree!

Originally posted by Zantra
Again I'm not arguing the value of religion at all. It brings meaning to many people's lives, weather it's real or not. Some people define thier very existence based around religion. I don't disparage them for that. Religion has it's place in society. But we're not talking about the value that it adds, we're talking about it's definable reality. It's all subjective as the reality of it is in the eye of the believer. Belief in religion is what makes it real, scientific data aside. But as for me, I choose not to accept something based on something that can't be psysically defined or accounted for.
I don't understand why you are talking about religion in response to anything I said.

Originally posted by Zantra Well that's an interesting assessment, and it may be true in some cases, but I can't say I believe it's true in my case.
Right . . . but if what I say is correct, such individuals wouldn't be able assess their own underdevelopment because they would be lacking the precise skills they need to recognize that.

Originally posted by Zantra I do not accept religion at face value. However I am spiritual in other, more humanistic ways. I believe in, and uphold the beliefs that religion preaches. I enjoy humanistic experieces as much as the next guy, and interaction with people close to me, as many others do
Just so you know, I am not religious. I also do not think the idea that some sort of consciousness is at work behind creation is best represented by religion. If you could trash everyone else's concepts about God, and just contemplate totally neutrally about "something" going on besides mechanics and complexity, then is there anything reasonably possible in that regard?

Just being logical . . . It is obvious that consciousness exists, so there is no question that the potential for consciousness exists. Which is first, the potential for consciousness or consciousness? It has to be that the potential for a development precedes the actual development. So the question isn’t whether consciousness exists but rather: does the development of consciousness require the central nervous system of biology?

Most people acknowledge they have only experienced or observed consciousness which is alive in biology; this is the exact reason why materialists propose it is biology’s specialized assembly of physics and chemistry, along with its neuronal complexity, that causes consciousness to emerge from matter. Yet might not those biological beings who insist (the only beings known who can insist) on a biological cause for consciousness be viewing things anthropomorphically? In fact, isn’t it natural that the biological system would prioritize, orient perception toward, and even limit perception to, experiences of the physical environment in which biology evolved and within which biological beings now attempt to survive?

If an entire universe can seemingly emerge from out of nowhere why couldn't consciousness also spontaneously arise from some light-energy-oscillatory dynamic? I am not saying that happened, but because the potential for consciousness existed before its manifestation anywhere, what I don't see is the materialist's automatic assumptions.

If we know the potential for consciousness exists prior to biology, and that our own perception is likely colored by its biological and physical environment, how confidently can one assume that consciousness is created by biology alone?
 
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  • #70
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The scientific method is limited and flawed in that it can only study that which it can measure. It is a falicy to think that everything can be measured and thus science can study everything.
To attempt to measure love, beauty, life, consciousness or even intelligence, all things that are known to exist and have characteristic qualities and quantities, is to put arttificial limits, steps or definitions on something that is a continuum without steps or limits and thus is inherently indefinable.

We can say that something is more or less beautiful in our opinion but there is no way that we can measure the quality or quality of beauty that an object or person may have or contain. We can say that we love ice cream - we love chocolate more that vanilla ice cream - but not more than we love our children - but we love Jack more or less than we love Jill. Love cannot be measured limited or catagorized with any real meaningful sucess.

Science therefore cannot realistically study such qualities as beauty love or intelligence because it cannot be isolated limited and measured without destroying the very thing that gives it value, worth and reality. Yet, just as Biology does, when they do attempt to study such qualities they ,out of necessity, limit it and define to one measureable aspect whether real or not and say that they are measuring and studying for instance all intelligence and nothing that can be concidered intelligence is outside of those limits and definitions and get indignant when we tell them that they aren't and only fooling themselves if they really think that they are.

Zandra, you say that you cannot accept the existence of God because he cannot be proven, measured or studied objectively yet you know and value beauty, love and intelligence. Is this not inconsistant. Are you not putting an unrealistic condition on one nonmaterial subject while living in harmony and appreciation with a number of others that are equally immaterial and unmeasureable and indefinable. Yet you admit that you are spiritual. Would it be better to say that you have yet to experience God on a personal basis.

You are not the only one who believes or at least says that they believe as you do. We refuse to accept God because God is not necessary, not material, not measureable and has no universal definition yet we believe in life, consciousness, beauty and intelligence. Is this consistant, logical and reasonable?
 

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