My Dream

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  • #51
Tsu
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Well, after 20+ years - between him and the cats - I've gotten fairly used to sleeping on an 18" slice along the edge of the bed. :rolleyes: :biggrin:

edit: and what's with this 'HALF' thing? :confused: What wife EVER gets half of her bed???? :cry: :cry:
 
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  • #52
arildno
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Tsu said:
Well, after 20+ years - between him and the cats - I've gotten fairly used to sleeping on an 18" slice along the edge of the bed. :rolleyes: :biggrin:
Aaw poor Tsu!
Did the women's lib movement pass right by you?
This is the very sort of discrimination they fought against!

EDIT:
YES!!
A woman has the right to half a bed, according to moderate feminists.
 
  • #53
Tsu
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Yeah. Tell that to Ivan and the cats... :rolleyes: :biggrin:
 
  • #54
Evo
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Tsu said:
Yeah. Tell that to Ivan and the cats... :rolleyes: :biggrin:
I hear ya sis!!! I don't even think I get 18" after the cats and the dog, for some reason, the other half of the bed is empty. :grumpy: They seem to all need the space I am in. :devil:
 
  • #55
Moonbear
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Evo said:
I hear ya sis!!! I don't even think I get 18" after the cats and the dog, for some reason, the other half of the bed is empty. :grumpy: They seem to all need the space I am in. :devil:
I used to do that to my ex-boyfriend. :devil: He'd ask me what side of the bed I wanted, and I'd tell him whichever side he was on. :biggrin: I was trying to remember how I managed to share a twin bed in college, then realized I was always against the wall, and it was my boyfriend who was hanging on for dear life. :rofl:

My dream? To have someone to fight me for 18" of space on the bed. :biggrin:
 
  • #56
loseyourname
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honestrosewater said:
Okay, this may sound far-fetched:

My dream is hard to relate, because I only have an inkling as to how it would work. I want to create, let's say, a 'mechanical procedure' (or set of separate procedures) for 'creative writing'. And not just any writing, but the next Shakespeare. Well, the system will be adaptable, but my version will be the next Shakespeare. Eh, yeah, that's it.

Hopefully, everyone will think I'm crazy and not try to beat me to it. :biggrin:
Are you talking about a program, or simply a plot formula? Plenty of the latter already exist. In fact, there is a 12 step formula for crafting a Shakespearean tragic hero:

1) Man of High Estate.
We have a man of high estate, a king, prince, general, etc. Often, our first views of the hero are skewed through the eyes and views of another, giving us a hint at their potential and greatness.

2) A Flaw in Character.
We then become aware of a driving force within the hero, something that often at least borders on obsession. We will also witness the nature of the inner torment he goes through as he follows his obsession.

3) Intrusion of Time and a Sense of Urgency.
As the inner and outer conflicts the hero faces as he pursues his course intensify, we see time becoming more and more important. A sense of urgency develops with the plot and the conflict that not only creates tension, but also creates the effect of a kind of steamrolling inevitability regarding the hero's fall that he has put into motion himself.

4) Misreadings and Rationalizations.
Contributing to, and furthering the obsession and the control of the tragic flaw, are misreadings, supernatural suggestion, and accident or chance. Things happen a split-second too late: the hero operates on what he believes to be the case rather than what he actually knows to be the case. Soon they are one and the same thing to him.

5) Murder, Exile, Alienation of Enemies and Allies.
As the story continues, conflicts arise which cause the death or alienation of all of the hero's former friends, allies, and/or mentors, eventually removing all forms of support for the hero. He must face things alone.

6) Gradual Isolation of the Tragic Hero.
Soon the hero is isolated, brining on new problems: sleeplessness, rage, confusion, hallucination, and violence.

7) Mobilization of the Opposition.
At some point, the opposing forces must mobilize against the hero in order to bring the tragedy to its conclusion.

8) Tragic Recognition of the Flaw by the Tragic Hero: Too Late.
At some point, the hero must realize the mistake he has made that is bringing about his demise. He must know that he, and he alone, is to blame for his downfall. However, this recognition always comes to late to save the life of the hero.

9) Last, Courageous Attempt to Restore Lost Honor/Greatness.
While the hero's life is forfeit, he does, after Tragic Recognition, receive some chance to redeem himself, at least a little. A display of courage, nobility of the heart, self-sacrifice, something to show us that while he was someone who needed to be defeated, brought down, or even a monster, he had good in him.

10) Audience Recognizes Potential for Greatness.
This is inevitably tied to the hero's attempt to restore his greatness. The audience must recognize what a tragic waste the death of the hero is, what kind of person he could have been had it not been for his mistakes and downfall.

11) Death of the Tragic Hero.
The Hero Must Die. Finito. The End.

12) Restoration of Order.
A central theme to all Shakespearean plays, tragedies and others. The natural order of things must be reestablished.
 
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  • #57
wolram
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Evo said:
I hear ya sis!!! I don't even think I get 18" after the cats and the dog, for some reason, the other half of the bed is empty. :grumpy: They seem to all need the space I am in. :devil:
Am i jealous of cats and dogs? wellYes :rofl:

Benji is to big for my single bed, he tried a couple of times but rolled onto
the floor, he gave such a look of disgust as if it were my fault.
 
  • #58
honestrosewater
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loseyourname said:
Are you talking about a program, or simply a plot formula?
A program. I think there will be at least two major parts: The first will write a special narrative; The second will use that narrative to write the actual dialogue.
 
  • #59
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The latent-inhibition factor of a tin Shakespeare

honestrosewater said:
A program. I think there will be at least two major parts: The first will write a special narrative; The second will use that narrative to write the actual dialogue.
You are talking not just about artificial intelligence but about artificial genius (eminent creativity). You should do some reading. First assignment:
https://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0521485088&tag=pfamazon01-20

Pop Quiz:

What is latent inhibition and what does it have to do with creativity?
 
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  • #60
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Also, notice might be paid to the fact that Eysenck's Genius mentions the Maunder Minimum. Sun spot activity correlates with genius activity.
 
  • #61
SpaceTiger
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Write here what is your dream
I have a dream that we will one day live in a nation in which we are not judged by the color of our skin, but by the content of our refrigerator.
 
  • #62
wolram
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SpaceTiger said:
I have a dream that we will one day live in a nation in which we are not judged by the color of our skin, but by the content of our refrigerator.
Oh heck, a dried up lemon and a half eaten pork pie :cry: :rofl:
 
  • #63
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Anyone capable of devising an artificial genius that could write the works of the new Shakespeare could more easily just write them himself.
 
  • #64
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zoobyshoe said:
Anyone capable of devising an artificial genius that could write the works of the new Shakespeare could more easily just write them himself.
I think that would depend upon how many different works one wanted to produce.
 
  • #65
Evo
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SpaceTiger said:
I have a dream that we will one day live in a nation in which we are not judged by the color of our skin, but by the content of our refrigerator.
(note to self - clean refrigerator :redface: )
 
  • #66
honestrosewater
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hitssquad said:
I think that would depend upon how many different works one wanted to produce.
Yes, and I think figuring out how the process works, or one way it could work, is also valuable. And there are more general problems that would need to be solved, and one would aim to make the system adaptable.

I don't know if I qualify as a 'creative person', but I've noticed that I'm more observant than most of the people around me. And I think this has made my OCD much worse, because I notice triggers everywhere. I never even finished my list of objects and situations that trigger an attack, because I realized that it could easily reach into the 300s. The (real) examples I had seen listed 15-30. I was using the same level of detail too.

Eh, but I don't want to derail the discussion. Just something I've noticed.
 
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  • #67
honestrosewater
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zoobyshoe said:
Anyone capable of devising an artificial genius that could write the works of the new Shakespeare could more easily just write them himself.
Actually, I'm going to disagree on this for another reason. I think having some creative writing skills would help, but you can learn about the process by studying people who do have those skills. And the program wouldn't necessarily mimic the process in humans; That's one of the goals - the other is just getting the same end result.
 
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  • #68
loseyourname
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I had a dream last night. The relevant details involved me running in with a tribe of island-dwellers in some fictional world. Similar to modern-day pearl divers, they spent so much time underwater that they had actually evolved the ability to hold their breath for incredibly long periods of time (upwards of fifteen minutes). They took me to a series of underwater caverns they dwelt in, which had air and were lit by some form of bioluminescent microorganisms. Once there, they showed me how they had learned to suppress the electrical activity of these giant eel-like filter feeders that terrorized the waters and had also learned to steer them so as to clean the coastal rivers and estuaries that they depended on on land. The dream woke me up just after midnight and I quickly wrote all this down, figuring it might prove useful as part of a story idea.
 
  • #69
honestrosewater
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loseyourname said:
I had a dream last night. <snip> The dream woke me up just after midnight and I quickly wrote all this down, figuring it might prove useful as part of a story idea.
Set it in French Polynesia and make them black pearls. :approve:
 
  • #70
loseyourname
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honestrosewater said:
Set it in French Polynesia and make them black pearls. :approve:
Naw, I don't want it set on earth. There are no giant filter-feeding, air-breathing electric eels on earth. I'll probably have to modify this somewhat anyway. Despite the fact that it came straight out of a dream, it bears a striking resemblance to the sandworms/makers of Dune.
 
  • #71
honestrosewater
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loseyourname said:
Naw, I don't want it set on earth. There are no giant filter-feeding, air-breathing electric eels on earth.
You never know, there are some very remote, mysterious areas in FP. :surprised You could be a Berkeley grad student doing research at the Gump Station. But okay, I'll back off. :smile:
 
  • #72
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honestrosewater said:
I don't know if I qualify as a 'creative person', but I've noticed that I'm more observant than most of the people around me. And I think this has made my OCD much worse, because I notice triggers everywhere.
You've just solved the riddle of Monk and The Aviator for me, not to mention greatly qualifying my understanding of Nikola Tesla.

I've been misunderstanding the fictional TV detective Monk to be noticing details all around him that no one else pays attention to, because his OCD makes him a "neatness-freak". However, it is much more likely he notices and remembers all this stuff, because it's all triggers, and has the proper sort of emotional valence to get stored in the category of important memories.

Howard Hughs and Nikola Tesla probably noticed and stored scads of detailed information that no one else paid attention to for the same reason, some of which information they could later use in their engineering.
 

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