My fossils

  • Thread starter Evo
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Evo
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Here are a few of my fossil rocks I picked up outside, they are everywhere.

I am going to post some large ones for detail, so sorry if you have to scroll. I was going to post this in earth but images are disabled.

Bear with me as I add pictures.

fossil51qw1.jpg


fossil3mp7.jpg


brachipodsfernleafka1.jpg
 

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  • #2
Evo
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pdr00401nk2.jpg


pdr00421ho6.jpg


pdr00431cw9.jpg
 
  • #3
turbo
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Nice! There must be limestone everywhere around you.
 
  • #4
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Nice Evo! The cylindrical ones in the first picture look like crynoid stems while the others look like fossil bryozoans ie; coral. I actually took a trip to an old limestone quarry in Alabama just a few days ago. If I can take some pics i'll post them up.
 
  • #5
Evo
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Yes, if you have fossil pictures, post them here!!

It's sandstone and limestone turbo. Unfortunately I had to leave all of my fossil rocks except for these few at my old house, I had hundreds. I see some down in the ditch of darn though.

I have more pictures I am trying to find.
 
  • #6
Evo
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This one is quartz, but it appears to have formed around something that is not part of the quartz. If I had my old photo software,you could see how the quartz forms a lattice enclosure over something inside.

fossilenclosedbs5.jpg


This is the other side.

pdr0065em4.jpg
 
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  • #7
Astronuc
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Very cool!

You could set up a road side stand and sell fossils to tourists. :biggrin:
 
  • #8
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I really need to scan the ones in my display case, but here's a few I have laying on my dresser and coffee table.

Brachiopods
brachipods.jpg


Underside of the brachiopod at the bottom in the previous picture
brachipodcrystals.jpg


Bryozoans
bryozoa.jpg


Crinoid Stems
crinoids.jpg
 
  • #9
Evo
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Those are awesome B.Elliot!!!! I wonder if mine are still at my old house? :cry: I had some crinoids as big around as my thumb and 8" long. <snif> Most of the really large brachiopods had slightly crushed tops where they had been exposed. Had what looked like shark teeth in some.
 
  • #10
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Those are awesome B.Elliot!!!! I wonder if mine are still at my old house? :cry: I had some crinoids as big around as my thumb and 8" long. <snif> Most of the really large brachiopods had slightly crushed tops where they had been exposed. Had what looked like shark teeth in some.
Thank you. :biggrin:

I'd love to find some crinoids of that diameter, especially that length! All of mine range from a 1/4" to 1-1/2" at most. If you can get a hold of the shells with the teeth, I'd looove to see them.
 
  • #11
Evo
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Thank you. :biggrin:

I'd love to find some crinoids of that diameter, especially that length! All of mine range from a 1/4" to 1-1/2" at most. If you can get a hold of the shells with the teeth, I'd looove to see them.
That crinoid stem in the middle of post two is one stem, you can see where it was broken, that one is about 10" long. Also, I should add that I can wear a size 7 ring on my thumb! I am positive that I moved with me a mid section of a crinoid inbedded in rock as big around as my thumb, very cool. I moved that one because it broke off from a larger piece and I threw it in the box. I will go crazy until I find it.
 
  • #12
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I hope all theses pictures don't completely overtake anyones connection, so i'll only post a few more. Awesome thread Evo! :biggrin:

Trilobites: Dalmanites
trilobites2.jpg


Trilobites
Top: Calymene
Bottom: Ptychagnostus
trilobites.jpg


Trilobite: Metacanthina
trilobite-1.jpg


Bryozoan: Plumatella repens (Not 100% sure)
coral.jpg


These are from a dig I went on at the Coon Creek formation in western Tennessee.
Top Right: Complete Pterotrigonia thoracica (Official Tennessee state fossil)
Others: Cyclina parva.
cooncreek.jpg


If you ever find any that are very brittle and you fear they might get broken, coat them in Mop and Glo with a small brush and allow them to dry. I treated mine over ten years ago and the coating is still very strong
 
  • #13
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That crinoid stem in the middle of post two is one stem, you can see where it was broken, that one is about 10" long. Also, I should add that I can wear a size 7 ring on my thumb! I am positive that I moved with me a mid section of a crinoid inbedded in rock as big around as my thumb, very cool. I moved that one because it broke off from a larger piece and I threw it in the box. I will go crazy until I find it.
Good lord that thing is big. If you don't mind me asking, where was your old place located at? It almost has to be the southeastern area of the midwest.
 
  • #14
Evo
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Here are some brachiopods, you can see the different shapes and sizes.

pdr0031pe0.jpg
 
  • #15
Evo
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I hope all theses pictures don't completely overtake anyones connection, so i'll only post a few more. Awesome thread Evo! :biggrin:

Trilobites: Dalmanites
trilobites2.jpg


Trilobites
Top: Calymene
Bottom: Ptychagnostus
trilobites.jpg


Trilobite: Metacanthina
trilobite-1.jpg


Bryozoan: Plumatella repens (Not 100% sure)
coral.jpg


These are from a dig I went on at the Coon Creek formation in western Tennessee.
Top Right: Complete Pterotrigonia thoracica (Official Tennessee state fossil)
Others: Cyclina parva.
cooncreek.jpg


If you ever find any that are very brittle and you fear they might get broken, coat them in Mop and Glo with a small brush and allow them to dry. I treated mine over ten years ago and the coating is still very strong
Those are AWESOME!!!!! Unfortunately most rocks I pick up have been bulldozed by construction and it's hard to find nice whole specimens. I hate you!! :biggrin:

I live in Kansas, we were undersea 440 million years ago.
 
  • #16
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Ugh, Kansas, the most boring state I've ever been...Too flat!

Cool fossils all.
 
  • #17
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Those are AWESOME!!!!! Unfortunately most rocks I pick up have been bulldozed by construction and it's hard to find nice whole specimens. I hate you!! :biggrin:

I live in Kansas, we were undersea 440 million years ago.
Kansas?---Kansas has got some great places to go on the western side


I thought it would be fun to go to the Dakotas in the area where Sue was found if its available to the public
 
  • #18
Evo
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Can anyone identify the fossil toward the top right?

http://img518.imageshack.us/img518/3229/pdr00301fn1.jpg [Broken]

Arrgh, I had reduced this to e-mail it and hopefully the full size image is stil on the camera, but I have no way of downloading it right now.
 
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  • #19
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You should go into Paint and circle it...If its the one I think it is then it looks like a tiny trilobyte
 
  • #20
Evo
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I can enlarge it on my computer to see it beter, but I can't save it enlarged. It looks like a fleur de lis, not a trilobite.

rew, if you can view it enlarged on the Win 98 computer of yours, i'll e-mail it to you.

http://img518.imageshack.us/img518/6439/pdr0030redev6.jpg [Broken]
 
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  • #21
794
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sure, send it-



(--I'll try anything at least one time)
 
  • #22
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I thought it would be fun to go to the Dakotas in the area where Sue was found if its available to the public
Sadly, the US government is really starting to crack down on what fossils you can take from the land... unless it's a dig site that you go to with a university group or special organization. Even then, if you find anything spectacular, you're supposed to 'hand it over' (and that's if you even mention finding anything:biggrin:).

One that I always wanted to go to is u-digfossils in Utah. A Trilobite lovers dream...
http://www.u-digfossils.com/


Can anyone identify the fossil toward the top right?
It's pretty hard to tell because of the size. Given the ones you've shown so far it sounds like they'd range from the Carboniferous way back to the Ordovician. Here's a couple of quick reference charts...

Pennsylvanian
http://ebeltz.net/firstfam/penfos.gif

Mississippian
http://ebeltz.net/firstfam/misfos.gif

Devonian
http://ebeltz.net/firstfam/devfos.gif

Silurian
http://ebeltz.net/firstfam/silfos.gif

Ordovician
http://ebeltz.net/firstfam/ordfos.gif
 
  • #23
794
1
If it is, what the heck is that pattern? I can see if pretty clearly on my computer.

Hopefully the original is still in the Toshiba.
well, sugar----it sort of like goshawks-----one of a variety of them -chewed up and spit out and then put 10 million pounds of pressure on and cook for a couple hundred million years---


-------

get a REAL close close-up--that may help a little
 
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  • #24
Evo
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well, sugar----it sort of like goshawks-----one of a variety of them -chewed up and spit out and then put 10 million pounds of pressure on and cook for a couple hundred million years---


-------

get a REAL close close-up--that may help a little
Look at the nearby fossils on the rock, they aren't changed...

I need to get that cable for my camera.
 
  • #25
794
1
Look at the nearby fossils on the rock, they aren't changed...

I need to get that cable for my camera.
All of those fossils are not the full animal/plant---they are all parts and pieces

They were only selling for about 3 bucks on that link I posted---(and I would bet they sell them at RadioShack or Wal-Mart even)

(I gotta go pop some microwave kettle corn --Dr. Who is starting in about 10 minutes)
 
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