My isp limited my bandwidth, must find a way around this.

In summary: here are the only ports we block.permit icmp any any traceroutedeny icmp any any echo-replydeny icmp any any echodeny tcp any any range 135 139deny tcp any any eq 445deny tcp any any eq 1025deny tcp any any eq 1027deny tcp any any eq 1434deny udp any any eq 1434deny tcp any any eq 2745deny tcp any any eq 27374deny tcp any any eq 5554deny tcp any any eq 9996deny tcp any any eq 3127
  • #1
oldunion
182
0
Well after submitting a very long articulated email to my isp's support page, i got this in response:

We limit FTP to 128kbps. Any file transfering program we limit the
bandwidth because many of them are bandwidth intensive programs. The
rate
on it 128kbps.

I claimed i needed ftp for my work or some nonsense. This is trash, my p2p is now useless because i get 1kbs max if I am lucky. How can i get around this, I am open to ANY suggestion.
 
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  • #2
Are you sure the P2P going at less than 1 KB/s has to do with your ISP bandwidth? It sounds to me that your ISP just blocked those ports needed by P2P programs. If that's the case, you'd need to assign and open a new port for those programs.
 
  • #3
A P2P using the FTP protocols?... ok...
 
  • #4
sorry sorry, what i meant to say is that my ports are blocked because i can not get more than 1kb/s on p2p. my connection is fine. i have asked my isp to forward a port for me. if they say no, what can i do?
 
  • #5
Switch ISPs.
 
  • #6
If you depend that much on P2P then maybe switching ISPs is the least of your worries... :tongue2: You should be thinking about your addiction!

If you can't live without P2P programs, you'll have to switch ISPs.
 
  • #7
isps still do that? probably a router problem if its a port block, any decent p2p program allwos u to change the port on software level. umm, yeh.
 
  • #8
whozum said:
isps still do that? probably a router problem if its a port block, any decent p2p program allwos u to change the port on software level. umm, yeh.

to no avail. its not as if they blocked one, and not another. theyre all blocked and switching isp's is not an option because I am on a college campus and its part of the package.
 
  • #9
128kbps is 16kBps, not 1. It isn't your isp that is causing you to have slow transfers.

Also, most isps will cap uploads at substantially lower speeds than downloads. Are you sure you don't have them mixed up? An ISP wouldn't cap different types of downloads at different speeds - it would take too much effort.
 
  • #10
russ_watters said:
An ISP wouldn't cap different types of downloads at different speeds - it would take too much effort.

Actually some isp's are doing it. Below is a link to a thread over at Slyck News where some people discussed this same issue. A quick search will return many other accounts of isp's throttling bandwith of certain p2p aplications.

A quote from the thread;
more and more ISPs are throttling P2P traffic. Modern traffic shaping technology does not rely on simply blocking ports, but identifies all the major P2P protocols by packet analysis.

The thread; http://www.slyck.com/forums/viewtopic.php?t=9871
 
  • #11
Hmm, "port throttling." Wow, didn't know. Thanks.
 
  • #12
GOD__AM said:
Actually some isp's are doing it. Below is a link to a thread over at Slyck News where some people discussed this same issue. A quick search will return many other accounts of isp's throttling bandwith of certain p2p aplications.

A quote from the thread;
more and more ISPs are throttling P2P traffic. Modern traffic shaping technology does not rely on simply blocking ports, but identifies all the major P2P protocols by packet analysis.

The thread; http://www.slyck.com/forums/viewtopic.php?t=9871
There are also some tweaks you can do with packet sizing.

Most systems are still geared to dial-up and limit the size of a packet to 256k.

Throttling has to do with the polling of specific ports over a period of time.

Increasing the packet sizes allows the movement of a greater amount of data over the same number of polls. Even going up to 512K does not just double the size of the packet but removes the necessity for two sets of packet addressing and checksums etc.

256k is an anachronism only necessary for dial-up, switched connections resulting in freequent data loss due to analogue lines.
 
  • #13
Can someone tell me what responsibilties do cable boys assume in relation to ISP's ?
 
  • #14
i talked with my isp and they said this:

Here are the only ports we block.

permit icmp any any traceroute
deny icmp any any echo
deny icmp any any echo-reply
deny tcp any any range 135 139
deny tcp any any eq 445
deny tcp any any eq 1025
deny tcp any any eq 1027
deny tcp any any eq 1434
deny udp any any eq 1434
deny tcp any any eq 2745
deny tcp any any eq 27374
deny tcp any any eq 5554
deny tcp any any eq 9996
deny tcp any any eq 3127
deny tcp any any eq 6129
deny tcp any any eq 9900
deny tcp any any eq 31337
deny tcp any any eq 31338
deny udp any any range 135 netbios-ss
deny udp any any eq 1900
deny udp any any eq 31337
deny udp any any eq 31338
deny udp any any eq syslog
deny udp any any eq netbios-ns
deny udp any any eq netbios-dgm
deny tcp any any eq 2856

im using download on port 4111, and upload on port 4222. still unable to download at more than 1kb/s

the speeds will start at 1kb/s and then steadily drop to zero.
 
  • #15
oldunion said:
i talked with my isp and they said this:

Here are the only ports we block.

permit icmp any any traceroute
deny icmp any any echo
deny icmp any any echo-reply
deny tcp any any range 135 139
deny tcp any any eq 445
deny tcp any any eq 1025
deny tcp any any eq 1027
deny tcp any any eq 1434
deny udp any any eq 1434
deny tcp any any eq 2745
deny tcp any any eq 27374
deny tcp any any eq 5554
deny tcp any any eq 9996
deny tcp any any eq 3127
deny tcp any any eq 6129
deny tcp any any eq 9900
deny tcp any any eq 31337
deny tcp any any eq 31338
deny udp any any range 135 netbios-ss
deny udp any any eq 1900
deny udp any any eq 31337
deny udp any any eq 31338
deny udp any any eq syslog
deny udp any any eq netbios-ns
deny udp any any eq netbios-dgm
deny tcp any any eq 2856

im using download on port 4111, and upload on port 4222. still unable to download at more than 1kb/s

the speeds will start at 1kb/s and then steadily drop to zero.


If you read the link I quoted you would see that it doesn't have to do with port blocking exactly, but by identifying protocols of certain p2p packets. It doesn't matter what port you use it may still block the packets it identifys as undesirable.

My suggestion would be to try another p2p program that's not quite as popular (not sure what you are using). I myself use bit tornado, and don't experience any problems, but that doesn't mean it will work for you. Read some (or start a thread) at the forums I posted if you really want to get around this, the people there will most likely be more helpful as the whole site is about p2p programs...
 

1. How can I bypass my ISP's bandwidth limitations?

There are a few options you can try to bypass your ISP's bandwidth limitations. One option is to use a virtual private network (VPN) which can encrypt your internet traffic and make it harder for your ISP to detect your bandwidth usage. Another option is to use a proxy server, which can act as an intermediary between your device and the internet, making it more difficult for your ISP to track your data usage.

2. Why is my ISP limiting my bandwidth?

ISPs may limit bandwidth for various reasons, such as managing network congestion, enforcing data caps, or promoting certain services or plans. It's important to check your ISP's terms and conditions to understand their policies on bandwidth limitations.

3. Can I take legal action against my ISP for limiting my bandwidth?

In most cases, ISPs have the right to limit bandwidth as outlined in their terms and conditions. However, if you feel that your ISP is unfairly limiting your bandwidth or violating any laws or regulations, you can consult with a lawyer about potential legal action.

4. Will using a bandwidth throttling tool help me bypass my ISP's limitations?

Using a bandwidth throttling tool may temporarily improve your bandwidth speeds, but it is not a reliable solution for bypassing your ISP's limitations. Your ISP may still be able to detect your data usage and limit your bandwidth accordingly.

5. How can I monitor my bandwidth usage to avoid going over the limit set by my ISP?

You can use various tools and software to monitor your bandwidth usage, such as built-in network usage monitors on your device or third-party apps. Additionally, most ISPs have online account portals where you can check your data usage and set up alerts for when you are approaching your limit.

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