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NaCl's viscosity

  1. Jun 22, 2005 #1
    Viscosity of a solution of NACl

    Hi!

    Who could give me the correct value of NaCl's viscosity (in solution)?

    Thanks!

    Regards,

    tyutyu
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 22, 2005 #2

    Gokul43201

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    Look in your library for either of the following :

    Handbook of electrolyte solutions. V.M.M. Lobo. Elsevier, 1989. 2 vols.

    Handbook of electrochemical constants. R. Parsons. Butterworths Scientific, 1960.

    In general, the viscosity is a function of temperature and concentration.
     
  4. Jun 22, 2005 #3

    Gokul43201

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    I'm leaving this open. Tyutyu, do not post multiple copies of the same post - it is considered spam.
     
  5. Jun 23, 2005 #4
    Wouldn't it depend on the concentration and temperature of the solution?
     
  6. Jun 23, 2005 #5
    Yes of course...in "standard" conditions it would be ok for me.

    Temperature: 298F (or 25 °C)
    Concetration: 0.1 mol/L

    Thanks

    tyutyu
     
  7. Jun 23, 2005 #6
    Sorry, I don't know myself. I don't know much about chemistry.
     
  8. Jun 23, 2005 #7
    Ok Daminc lol!

    Does somebody know the value that I am searching? It is applied to process numerical simulation so I nedd a correct value and not an approximation.

    The problem is that I don't have the possibility to check in the books mentionned by Gokul....

    Thanks.

    BR

    tyutyu
     
  9. Jun 23, 2005 #8

    Gokul43201

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    For whatever it's worth : at a concentration of 0.1M, the mole fraction is 0.1/55 or less than 0.2%. I do not expect the viscosity to be off by more than 0.5% from that of distilled water at NTP. Do you need a better accuracy than that, really ?
     
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