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Naming compounds

  • Thread starter chemzz
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  • #1
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Name the following :ZnI2, BrF, FeSO3, CaH2, BaHPO3,CuNO3, AgIO, SO2

write the correct formula of these: zinc sulphate, barium nitrate, gold(III)nitrate, barium chloride, mercurous nitrate, antimony(V)cloride, ferrous bromide, calcium carbonate and hydrobromic acid.


i have attempted them as aswell....
 
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Answers and Replies

  • #2
1,752
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attempt? you need to show some work b4 help is given.
 
  • #3
18
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ok...so i got these...
ZnI2 - Zinc Iodide
BrF-Barium Floride
FeSO3- Iron sulphite
CaH2- Calcium hyroxide
BaHPO3-Barium hypophosphate
CuNO3- Copper Nitrate
AgIO2- Gold(II)Idoxide
SO2- Sulphide
 
  • #4
18
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For the formulas i got...
zinc sulphate- ZnSO3
barium nitrate-BaNO3
gold(III)sulpahte- AgSO3
barium chloride- BaCl
mercurous nitrate- i don't get this one!
antimony (V) cloride- AtCl5
ferrous bromide- FeBr
calcium carbonate- CaCO3
hydrobromic acid- HBO3
 
  • #5
18
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now do i get my answer?
 
  • #6
mgb_phys
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CaH2- Calcium hyroxide
Where's the oxygen?

A good guide to naming is http://www.ausetute.com.au/namiform.html
The whole point of systematic naming is so you don't have to remember lots of fake latin endings and just write the oxidation state in the name. Looks lke inorganic chemistry has some catching up to do.
 
  • #7
chemisttree
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ok...so i got these...
BrF-Barium Floride
Is 'Br' barium?

CaH2- Calcium hyroxide
Hydroxide is the functional group 'OH'.

BaHPO3-Barium hypophosphate
'Hypo' refers to the lowest of the oxidation states for oxyanions. Do you know the oxidation state for phosphorous in phospate, phosphite (phosphonate) and hypophosphite?

AgIO2- Gold(II)Idoxide
SO2- Sulphide
IO2- is not 'idoxide'. It is the lowest oxidation state (for iodine) of the iodine oxyanion series. Sulphide is S-2...

Here is some information from an old textbook of mine ("Inorganic Chemistry", James Huheey, 3rd ed. 1983.)

The names for monoatomic anions shall consist of the name (sometimes abbreviated) of the elements with the termination '-ide'.

It is quite practical to treat oxygen also in the same manner as other ligands but it has long been customary to ignore the name of this element altogether in anions and to indicate its presence and proportion by means of a series of prefixes and sometimes also by the suffix -ite in place of -ate. The termination -ite has been used to denote a lower state of oxidation and may be retained in trivial names in the following cases:...
An example of the nomenclature of chlorine-containing anions is:

Cl- chloride (Cl-1)
ClO- hypochlorite (Cl-1, the lowest oxidation number of the oxyanions of Cl)
ClO2- chlorite (Cl+3)
ClO3- chlorate (Cl+5)
ClO4- perchlorate (Cl+7, the highest oxidation number of the oxyanions of Cl)

The suffix -ous and -ic are used to denote the lowest and highest oxidation state respectively, as in cuprous (Cu+1) and cupric (Cu+2).

Any help?
 

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