Nanoscale Energy Transport: Speed of Electron Gas in Semiconductor (Chen: 1.10)

In summary, to estimate the average random speed of an electron gas in a semiconductor at 300 K, we can use the Fermi-Dirac distribution equation and calculate the Fermi energy of the semiconductor. This approach is more accurate than using the classical interpretation and kinetic theory. It's important to understand the underlying principles and use the appropriate equations for a rigorous explanation. Best of luck with your studies!
  • #1
Diomarte
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Before I ask the question, let me explain a little bit about myself. I graduated just over a year ago with a bachelors in Physics, and am now starting my first semester of grad school in Energy Engineering. I have been out of practice, and am facing major struggles getting back into my coursework. I understand that the purpose of this forum is not to provide homework solutions, but rather to give a direction or guidelines to finding a solution for the inquiring party. Thank you for your help in this regard. I hope to get back into the swing of things, and become a contributing member of this community soon!


Homework Statement



Speed of Electrons: Estimate the average random speed of an electron gas in a semiconductor at 300 K.

Homework Equations



Fermi-Dirac Distribution: f(E) = 1/(exp[ (E-u)/(KbT)]+1.
Mass of Electron: 9.1x10^-31kg
Classical Interpretation and Kinetic Theory: 1/2mv^2 = 3/2 KbT <== I'm tempted to use this, but I find it unreliable and not accurate for an electron gas, but that could just be me making things more difficult than they need to be... If this were the case, then obviously v would be Sqrt(3KbT/mass), which comes out to be about 1.5x10^5. Which IS in fact a relatively close estimate for semiconductors, BUT it's hardly what I'd call a rigorous explanation.

The Attempt at a Solution


See above related to classical interpretation and Kinetic Theory of Gasses.

Thanks again!
 
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  • #2


I can understand your struggles in getting back into coursework after being out of practice for a while. It's important to remember that it takes time and effort to get back into the swing of things, but with determination and persistence, I have no doubt that you will become a contributing member of this community soon.

Now, onto the question at hand. To estimate the average random speed of an electron gas in a semiconductor at 300 K, we can use the Fermi-Dirac distribution equation you provided: f(E) = 1/(exp[ (E-u)/(KbT)]+1. This equation takes into account the quantum nature of electrons in a solid and is more accurate for an electron gas than the classical interpretation and kinetic theory.

To solve for the average speed, we need to first find the Fermi energy (u) for the semiconductor. This can be calculated using the equation u = (h^2/8m)(3π^2n)^(2/3), where h is Planck's constant, m is the mass of an electron, and n is the electron density of the semiconductor. Once we have the Fermi energy, we can plug it into the Fermi-Dirac distribution equation along with the temperature (300 K) and the Boltzmann constant (Kb) to solve for the average speed.

I hope this helps guide you in finding a solution to your question. Remember, it's important to understand the underlying principles and use the appropriate equations rather than relying on simplified or inaccurate methods. Good luck with your studies and I look forward to seeing you become a valuable member of this community.
 

Related to Nanoscale Energy Transport: Speed of Electron Gas in Semiconductor (Chen: 1.10)

1. What is nanoscale energy transport?

Nanoscale energy transport refers to the movement of energy at the nanometer scale, which is the scale of individual atoms and molecules. This type of energy transport can occur through various mechanisms, such as heat transfer, electron transport, and photon transport.

2. What is the speed of electron gas in a semiconductor?

The speed of electron gas in a semiconductor varies depending on factors such as temperature, electric field, and material properties. However, in general, the speed of electron gas in a semiconductor can range from tens to hundreds of meters per second.

3. How does nanoscale energy transport impact semiconductor devices?

Nanoscale energy transport plays a crucial role in determining the performance of semiconductor devices. For example, the speed of electron gas in a semiconductor affects the speed of operation of electronic devices, while the heat transfer mechanisms can impact the reliability and efficiency of these devices.

4. What are some current research areas in nanoscale energy transport?

Some current research areas in nanoscale energy transport include the development of new materials with improved thermal and electrical properties, the exploration of new mechanisms for energy transport at the nanoscale, and the integration of nanoscale energy transport into various applications, such as energy harvesting and thermal management.

5. How can nanoscale energy transport be controlled and manipulated?

Nanoscale energy transport can be controlled and manipulated through various means, such as by modifying the material properties, applying external electric or magnetic fields, or designing structures at the nanoscale level. Additionally, advances in nanotechnology and nanofabrication techniques allow for precise control and manipulation of energy transport at the nanoscale.

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